Alpha Male Tea Party – Health

OK yeah, that name is weird, let's move on together, shall we? Alpha Male Tea Party are another stroke in the fast expanding painting that is the "bright" math-rock community, once spearheaded by acts like Adebisi Shank and And So I Watch You From Afar and now containing as diverse acts as VASA or MNHM. The joining thread seems to be first a musical and, second, a geographical one. As far as the music goes, one can expect major chords played over energetic beats, creating frantic excursions into disjointedly optimistic riffs and an overall sensation of...satisfied loss? Let's go with that. Geographically, the main output in this field seems to erupt from the British Isles, Perfidious Albion, or however else you'd like to call that strange, strange group of disparate places.

MNHM – Of Empires Past

Mannheim, Germany (while an important industrial center) is not somewhere you'd expect to be given the "chic lettering" treatment but here we are. MNHM (who are not, in fact, from Mannheim) play a weird blend of math rock and post metal, perhaps somewhat hinting at the industrial prowess of their namesake. Their sound manages to be both bright and oppressive at the same time and, while their previous release featured plenty of progressive wheeling and dealing, Of Empires Past wastes no time on subtlety or too much nuance. Instead, the album leans heavily on its musical haunches, continuously battering the listener with its chromatic (in the aesthetic sense) styling. As a last effort to convey the sensation before we jump into the thick of it, imagine being pummeled over the head by And So I Watch You From Afar's All Hail Bright Futures. Repeatedly. For about forty minutes. OK, now we're ready to get started.

Arms Of Tripoli – Daughters

Last we wrote about the LA post/math-rock enclave Arms of Tripoli was for their 2014 debut full-length Dream In Tongues, which came to us out of nowhere and quickly became a blog favorite among several of us for its mixture of bright and summery post-rock and shoegaze sounds with some knottier and more math-y elements thrown in to keep things more than interesting. As a brief personal pretext to this, Dream In Tongues was one of the first albums I reviewed for Heavy Blog, was the first album I had given a very positive review of, and it was also quite possibly the first album that myself and now editor-in-chief Eden Kupermintz (both of us were still just mere innocent and not yet completely jaded newbie writers at that point) bonded over, thus forging a friendship and partnership that is responsible for much of what you know of Heavy Blog as today.

Holy Roar Records Files Pt.3 – Pijn’s Floodlit

Hello folks! Usually the title above connotes that you're about to be treated to the writings (or ramblings) of on Matt MacLennan. He usually handles these posts about Holy Roar Records and all their wonderful bands, usually containing some sort of relationship with hardcore. However, we're doing things differently this time around because we're handling a slightly different sound and now I am here! The band in question is Pijn and their album Floodlit, which saw release a few days ago, on the 27th of January. Floodlit is an interesting blend between happy-go-lucky post/math rock in the style of VASA or And So I Watch You From Afar and heavy, grandiose post metal. Right? I can't think of many other labels besides Holy Roar that would be a fitting home for something like that. Let's send you on down for your first listen and congregate after for some choice words.

Hey! Listen to Enemies!

I'm pretty late to the math rock train; the genre has been steadily climbing into the void filled by indie among Internet Metal Nerds, garnering niche attention and love for close to a decade now. However, never say never, right? It helps that math rock seems on the verge of multiple branching points right now, reaching left and right for new sounds, flavors and inspirations. Thus, you get post rock and math rock, math rock and emo, math rock and electronica and so much more. So why not math rock that's all smooth edges, buttery melodies and spaced out compositions more akin to the trippy sides of stoner rock? I present to you Enemies and their Valuables, an album that's all undulating bass, delayed guitars and plenty of rhythm to make everything tick. The math rock is what makes everything tick, the dynamo pulsing beneath the melodic oscillations.

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 8/26/16

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.net through your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 6/3/16

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.net through your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

Love Of Cartography: A Taxonomy Of Post Rock

The goal of these taxonomy posts is not to provide an exhaustive and accurate list or definition of a certain genre or genres. Quite the opposite in fact: attempting to make such a complete list would only replace one stagnated image-object with another, creating an equally irrelevant definition, whether it can be considered currently accurate or not. Therefore, we want to keep some of that fuzz, to leave ends untied and room for further articles and discussion among our readers. We're not saying that this is going to be a series; these posts take far too much time and energy to commit to something like that. We are saying however that there's plenty more to discuss, within and without the progressive metal genre and we'll try and do that when we can. So, post rock. Post rock is a perfect candidate for such an examination. On the one hand, there's a very strong and often negative image of what post rock is. Seminal bands like Godspeed You! Black Emperor, God Is An Astronaut and Explosions In The Sky have enjoyed widespread, cultural popularity, solidifying the image of post rock in the eyes of the public. Pretentious, long-winded, dreamy, beautiful, cinematic, instrumental and rarified are all adjectives which were born from this image. Post rock was, and still is, perceived as a genre for the few, starry eyed and sentimental. Perhaps owing to just how good the afore-mentioned bands really are, their music also overpowered the conceptual space for the genre, leading people to expect certain things from the music that fell under the moniker.