An Interview with Andy Marsh of Thy Art Is Murder

As you may have noticed, over the past month or so we’ve been interviewing a series of Australian artists, and we’ll continue to bring those to you this month. Today we’re lucky enough to be joined by Andy Marsh, guitarist in Australian deathcore outfit Thy Art is Murder. The band have been making waves on the international scene for some time now and are one of Australia’s more successful exports. Vocalist CJ McMahon has recently reunited with the band and a new record is on the way, so we spoke to Andy about that, their split EP with Fit For An Autopsy and The Acacia Strain (available here), Australia and more. Enjoy!

64 – Canadians In Cars Getting Tech-Death

  Eden is out doing shady things, and I am yet again ridden with the darned cold, so this week we get Ahmed again and of course, we discuss tech death again. It’s relevant to recent happenings though! Mainly Relapse reissuing Necrophagist’s classic Epitaph. We also talk about the upcoming…

63 – How Is This Train Still Going?

Do you like deathcore? My condolences. Oh, I’m just kidding. There are some good bands in the genre. On an unrelated note (truly), there’s a new Within the Ruins song and a playthrough as well. Also, Born of Osiris are redoing their debut plus a new song, and the new Aversions Crown is great. We also discovered some more Season of Mist stuff, namely Replacire. Nergal of Behemoth’s new project Me And That Man is, well, interesting. Then we get incensed about people getting incensed about bands applying new funding and marketing models. Then we discuss why vocals are the main off-putting thing for a lot of people, and on that note, how avant-garde bands aren’t really that avant-garde. Enjoy!

Aversions Crown – Xenocide

Aversions Crown are keeping up the time-honored tradition of Australian metal bands doing what they do best: playing stupidly heavy music that makes you want to commit heinous acts of violence in the mosh pit. They’ve been doing this since their debut album Servitude, which showed the bands deft ability to play technical deathcore with a whopping three guitarists. After that, the band signed to Nuclear Blast and released Tyrant, which lowered the technicality of the instrumentals but added in a bit of experimentation with the atmosphere of the music. Their third and newest LP Xenocide sees the group settling into a healthy medium between the sounds their two previous albums established and refines them into a sound that the band could very easily settle into.

Fractal Generator – Apotheosynthesis

There’s a LOT of metal that takes its influence from space, from a conceptual, musical, or aesthetic standpoint, across every genre. Deathcore band Aversions Crown, for instance, holds down the heavy side of the fort with their neck-snapping grooves and grim ambience, all while their vocalists growl ruminations on planet-scale…