Deadspace – The Liquid Sky

Bands looking to work within the post black metal milieu face an inherent difficulty: how do you innovate on a genre that’s considered an innovation in and of itself? When you’re operating in a musical sphere which defines itself as “after” something, when the very basic approach of your genre is considered a departure from the core in which it originated, it can be hard to differentiate yourself from the rest of the bands relying on just the same definition. The first wave of post rock encountered the same problem, as did post punk and all the rest of the…

Post Rock Post – Afformance (Again, again!)

Yes, I know I’ve just written one of these posts where I said I rarely dedicate one to the same band but it’s really not my fault that bands we’ve already covered here keep releasing amazing music. It probably is my fault, however, that the format of these posts didn’t really take that into account. I’ll say a few prayers to a delay pedal in penance. For now, let’s talk about Afformance again. These guys, based in Athens, Greece, peddle in the most cinematic and expansive kind of post rock. Thing is, they make it work, standing high above the cut in the sea of mediocrity that has unfortunately come to categorize this brand of post rock in the past few years. Just last month, they released two albums: Pop Nihilism and Music For Imaginary Film #1 and while the former is just fine the latter is where I’d like to focus today.

Hey! Listen to Endur!

Honestly, Clear is probably my favorite release from Periphery. It was really refreshing to hear them connect to all the different sides of what makes up their musical palette. An especially great treat was Spencer Sotelo’s “The Parade of Ashes”; it was clear that Sotelo has a real passion for pop metal and everything it entails. His voice also works really well with that kind of influence. And, lo and behold, we now have a full release on which Sotelo really lets that passion shine through. Endur is its name and it sounds like what would happen if Michael Jackson, Nine Inch Nails and synthwave all had a horrific teleportation accident a la The Fly. Head on below for a taste!

Post Rock Post – Salvya (Again!)

It’s rare that I dedicate two Post Rock Posts to the same band; usually, they’re all about new artists operating within or around the post rock genre. However, sometimes artists change their sound so much from album to album that I feel as if they justify another entry in the same column. Besides, this is Heavy Blog; when have we been super strict about our definitions and categories? With these things in mind, let me update you as to Salvya and how they’ve been doing. I first wrote about this Israeli band over two years ago; they were gearing up for Unrecognizable then, an ethereal album that was firmly rooted around progressive and post rock influences and a strong main vocalist. Last week, the band released Impostor Syndrome and let’s just say there have been some changes. Head on over the jump for an example.

Release Day Roundup – 11/17/17

Each month, we always seem to come to the same conclusion when it comes to our Editors’ Picks column: Friday release days open the floodgates and unleash a seemingly endless stream of quality new music. But while some of our Editors and Contributors sit down gleefully each week to dive into this newly stocked treasure trove, others find themselves drawing a blank at the end of the month due to the breakneck pace needed to keep up to date with what’s been released. Which brings us to this Heavy Blog PSA: a weekly roundup of new albums which pares down the the week’s releases to only…

Impureza – La Caída De Tonatiuh

There have been previous attempts at integrating flamenco elements into metal. There have even been successful, good attempts at doing so. However, there are few that have been successful at blending them seamlessly. This applies not just to flamenco, but any influence outside of metal. It’s either the case where a regular metal song suddenly erupts into an irrelevant genre break, or it’s barely a metal album. The latter case usually happens, for example, when jazz musicians get together and write an album that’s mostly in their own wheelhouse, with some minor metal elements. Even further, the most extreme of metal subgenres are usually spared these excesses. Enter Impureza, a band that skirts the line between progressive and technical death metal, and perfectly fits flamenco into that picture. The end result is just delightful.