Rotten to the Core – devthbed, Justice for the Damned & Vein

We're at a point where a hot shit, flavour of the month band can become old hat moments after they are touted as the next big thing. It's so easy to lose track of who's who, what's hot and not and generally what the hell is happening in music and it's always gonna be impossible to hear everything good out there. That's where Heavy Blog, and others like us, come in. We have our core features focusing on specific genres—what's up Grind My Gears fans?!—but today I'm lumping together bands who's only similarity is their shared suffix. They're all "core" in some form or another. To make things more digestible, I've even added a strapline for each, covering their sound in one fantastically humorous sentence. Please, enjoy and rock responsibly.

Stone Sour – Hydrograd

In China, there is a myth that carp swimming upstream try valiantly to swim up a waterfall, a clearly impossible task. Yet, they persist and persevere, straining every muscle as they strive to reach the top, and sure enough, a rare few are able to get there. It is said that any carp which successfully makes the climb is then rewarded for their determination with transformation into a mighty dragon. After swimming upstream for a decade, Stone Sour announced themselves a dragon of rock with their last two LPs, House of Gold and Bones (HoGaB) Parts 1 & 2 respectively. The masterful double album was the epitome of progressive hard rock in the modern era, infused with a thrilling concept, reoccurring musical and lyrical motifs, seamless transitions and excellent riffs. Taylor’s vocals moved effortlessly between unbridled aggression and morose beauty. The songwriting was inspired, each song standing proudly on its own two feet, yet even better when placed alongside its brethren. It was a rare release to draw inspiration from the giants of the 70’s and, when all was said and done, comfortably stand shoulder-to-shoulder beside them. Thus one could be forgiven for feeling optimistic about where Stone Sour went next. Unfortunately, Jim Root’s acrimonious departure in mid-2014 led to doubts over their future sound and direction, doubts which a pair of cover EPs did little to dispel. And so here we are in 2017, four years on from the magic that was HoGaB. Stone Sour is back, with Christian Martucci (Black President, ex-Chelsea Smiles) having replaced Root on guitar. The question though, is can they live up to the hype?

These Are The Slams You Are Looking For: The Relationship Between Metal & Pro Wrestling

Long before I started watching wrestling in the mid-’90s, it was synonymous with metal. Whether it was dude’s with long hair who were evident fans of the genre, the theme rockin’ theme music they used or performances by bands at the shows, metal and wrestling have always been bedfellows that go together like spaghetti and meatballs, Beavis and Butthead and Nicki Minaj and terrible music. Given the long-standing relationship between each medium, we here at Heavy Blog thought it would be fun to examine their similarities and the components which connect them to establish why it is they've remained so interconnected throughout the years. Now, without further ado, LET'S GET READY TO RUMBLE!

Holy Roar Records Files Pt.4 – Employed To Serve’s The Warmth Of A Dying Sun

It's been a minute since our last Holy Roar Records File and even longer since I wrote one. It's only appropriate that the post is dusted off and brought back for this. Somehow, I hadn't covered Employed To Serve in this feature before but that HAD to change for one reason; The Warmth Of A Dying Sun releases today and is a bona fide game changer in hardcore and heavy music. You can throw Code Orange at me all you want, Employed To Serve are thee band at the forefront of genre smashing heavy music. As always, make your own damn mind up about but if you feel like you need convincing then read ahead. There will be bountiful amounts of hyperbole and fruity language - oh, and a track by track breakdown from EtS's very own Justine Jones. Tight.

Rick Chapple of Devil Sold His Soul – The Heavy Blog Interview

During the mid-2000s, the UK hardcore and metal scene underwent a re-energisation of sorts due to the emergence of several bands who have since spearheaded the genres to modern popularity. Bands like Enter Shikari and Bring Me the Horizon resonated with mainstream crowds since their inceptions and have since established themselves as global institutions. On the other hand, Architects instantly occupied the forefront of an underground charge and, over the years, have also crossed over into popular realms. However, bubbling underneath the surface was (and still is) a whole scene of innovative, vital artists whose records define the country’s musical output at its finest, with albums that will undoubtedly stand the test of time among aficionados of heavy music. One such act is Devil Sold His Soul who, in this writer’s humble opinion, are one of the best bands the UK has ever birthed.

Loathe – The Cold Sun

What's the difference between a good concept album and a shit one? Hard to say. Does it depend on the lyrical content? Thematic refrain and reprisal? Who knows. There's even sneaky concept albums, the likes of which the layman listener wouldn't even begin to fathom had intentions beyond riff, chorus, solo, repeat. The Cold Sun might be one of these; Loathe seem like a band bold enough to attempt such a thing on their debut full length. What isn't up for debate is this - The Cold Sun is just about all filler. Twelve tracks. Six songs. Zero (or damn close to it) cares.

Half-Life: Limp Bizkit

Limp Bizkit are far from the most unanimously loved band to ever grace the metal spectrum. Often derided as abrasive and angst-ridden rap metal for beer-swilling frat boys, it’s perfectly understandable why they’ve never found acclaim among the purists. However, there was a time when they were inescapable commercial juggernauts with a tendency to make headlines for the wrong reasons, as well as poster boys for the much maligned nu-metal subgenre.

Suicide Silence – Suicide Silence

When analyzing art, it is important to keep both the artist's experience in creating the art and the experience of the consumer absorbing the art in mind. Often times, an artist's vision can be obscured by our view point and we can lose sight of what was meant to be gained from the experience. On the other side, regardless of what an artist's intent may be, the consumer has every right to like or dislike something based on their own personal preference. There's even the possibility that you can completely understand where the creator of art is coming from and appreciate their intent and artistic integrity, but think that the art itself isn't something remotely enjoyable. In this middle ground of understanding and distaste for what is understood, we find the new self-titled Suicide Silence album nestled quite comfortably.

The Anatomy Of: Oni

2016 has been chock full of great releases, some of which we (sadly) missed out on. We can't post about everything or we'd be up to necks in content (first world problems, I know)! One such release is Oni's Ironshore, a progressive album that's extremely cohesive and endearing. Rooted firmly in complexity, Ironshore nonetheless manages to evoke melody, emotion and conviction. Listen to "Kanvas" for example: amidst breakneck keyboard work, intricate guitar lines, harsh and clean vocals, hides an honest emotional streak that runs throughout the album and ties it all together. Seeing as the album is so intricate, we thought we'd get the band to shed some more light on the influences that make them tick as musicians. We hoped it would give us more insight into what seems like another, incredibly strong addition to the annals of modern progressive metal and boy, we got more than we bargained for! Head on below to read their in depth and enlightening list in one of our personal favorite Anatomy Of posts!