EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Take a Dip in River Cult’s Halcyon Daze

Do you like to throw your ears to the whim of open, swirling compositions? Or are you just a sucker for the fuzz? Either way, the debut long player from Brooklyn’s River Cult has you covered. At a glance, Halcyon Daze is a dirty, bluesy, and doomy stomper of a record. Thickness in tow, it hits like a champ enough to satisfy those strong of neck. At the same time, it’s complete with loose, jammy structures, gradual and dramatic builds and breaks, fat tones, and freak out solos - it has all the ingredients for a truly great heavy psych record. With five tracks at a hearty seven-minute minimum, it gives you plenty to get swept up in without compromising their unique vision that brings these worlds together. Lucky for us, these dudes break from the (what can be) formulaic nature of these genres, and come out with a truly spectacular 2018 record. Head on over the jump to stream the entire thing!

Ecstatic Vision – Raw Rock Fury

Ecstatic Vision’s Raw Rock Fury is a good-natured record that most people are gonna want to like. It’s hard not to smile when the first track, which is all of 17 seconds long, is called “Intro” and is pretty much a swooshing noise. A cursory listen reveals these guys know their Nuggets and have been in several garages, surely. The band has made a fun enough record, at least while it’s being played. In a way it may even be the perfect record for the U.S in 2017—all flash and no substance. Whether this was intentional… well, that’s highly doubtful, though some listeners may feel otherwise. If you’re wondering whether you will enjoy this record, look at the cover and you will know. Raw Rock Fury can be judged by its cover, presumably something the band is intrinsically aware of.

Skeleton of God – Primordial Dominion

Music considered “psychedelic” tends to fall, loosely, into two categories. The first camp includes weird, off-kilter compositions, lots of trippy vocal effects and weird keyboard/synth flourishes (Animal Collective, Black Moth Super Rainbow, The Flaming Lips). The second camp tends to be defined by long instrumental passages, mostly partially or totally improvised jams (Earthless, Kyuss, Sleep, Phish, Grateful Dead). Billed as a “psychedelic stab of death infused metal,” Skeleton of God’s Primordial Dimension is the rare animal that combines both camps in a heady crockpot of healthy extreme metal.