Best of Closing Tracks

An album doesn’t really end when its last note is sounded. Or, at least, great albums don’t; there are definitely works out there that only span the time during which the music is playing. But truly great releases, like all great art, stick with their consumer far beyond than the…

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Leprous – Pitfalls

We’ve dealt with the question of context many times on the blog, mostly when reviewing releases from beloved bands. What weight should we give previous releases when taking new albums into consideration? It is fair to hold the past performance of a band up to their current output or do…

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Port Noir – The New Routine

By the time a band reaches their third album, it is not unreasonable to have a certain set of expectations about what it will deliver. Sometimes, the band will stumble and fail to meet them. Others will rise to the challenge and comfortably surpass them. And a third group, to…

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Death and the Penguin – Anomie

In 2018, the following sentence is a confession: I still really like brit-rock. Don’t get me wrong, the genre deserved everything it got; under the guise of alternative music and a rebel spirit, it connived with corporate interests to create some of the most plastic and regurgitated music ever made, hiding it all under the selfsame guise of edgy counter culture. But I was confessing; I still really like it. I like the morose style of vocals, I like the straight-forward guitar music, and I like the thin veneer of British depression and snark which coats it. And I love it when all of those elements are mixed with modern music, especially progressive rock. That’s a pretty specific formula but, luckily for me, Death and the Penguin have been working at it for a while now.