Hath – Of Rot and Ruin

2018 was a big year for progressive death metal, with outstanding releases coming from the likes of Rivers of Nihil, Alkaloid, Slugdge, Obscura and Beyond Creation – just to name a few. However, those bands also all already established and lauded acts. While there were a couple of head-turning debuts…

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The Anatomy Of: Hath

We’ll have a full review coming later in the week, but what you need to know right now is that Hath’s Of Rot and Ruin is easily one of the best albums of 2019. With their debut LP, the New Jersey quartet have crafted an album that stands up to…

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Contrarian – Their Worm Never Dies

The past is an odd thing; people expect you to come to terms with it and reference it in your art (in the form of genre norms and adherence to “the greats”) but not too blatantly, lest you be deemed a “rip off”. Once you’ve “touched” the past, it’s also extremely hard to shake it off, as your work will constantly be judged in light of it. Some bands solve these conflicts and nuances by simply diving head first into homage, worship, and clear references, preferring to cut through all the questions by explicitly communicating with their influences.

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Crescent – The Order of Amenti

Ancient-Egyptian-themed blackened death metal is a weirdly popular niche. It’s easy to understand the appeal, but just how popular the style can be is surprising at times. What’s even more surprising is that few of these bands are actually from Egypt (mostly this review’s namesake and Scarab). Enter Crescent, a band formed in 1999 but only put out their debut in 2014. Hailing from Cairo, they’ve fit in comfortably to this style, and ready to make waves with their second full-length, The Order of Amenti.

Doomsday // January 2018

Greetings Heaviest of Heavy Bloggers! Let me be the last to wish you a Happy New Year and welcome you back to Doomsday, our monthly roundup of the most noteworthy doom-centric releases from the past few weeks that deserve special recognition. As you may have already noticed, 2018 is starting…

Hey! Listen to Blame!

Ukraine’s Blame might only be in their infancy, but that hasn’t stopped them from releasing one of the most impressive slabs of punishing, grove-driven technical death metal in recent memory. Almanac is the second of two EPs which constitute the band’s entire discography to date, although it comes off like…

Death’s Door 2017 // Death Metal’s Year in Review

Welcome to the final installment of Death’s Door in the Year of Our Nefarious Overlord 2017! Wipe your feet on the mat, remove that stupid holiday-induced smile from your face, and prepare yourself for ultimate year-end audio brutalization. Because, quite frankly, 2017 was one of the best years for death metal in decades. A bold statement indeed, and thankfully one with plenty of data in the form of amazing records to back it up. The overwhelming number of releases in this dirtiest of metal subgenres, coupled with the breadth of quality releases in each of the branches of the death metal tree, all accumulate to create one of the most impressive lists of death metal albums in a given year since the early 1990s. 2017 presented us with exceptional records at such an alarming clip that it was often a full-time task to keep track of them. Death metal this year was in equal measure mind-numbingly technical, socially forward-thinking, compositionally adventurous, and reverent of the past, generating albums that displayed with full clarity all that makes this music the metal behemoth that it is. What a time to be alive. In our final segment of Death’s Door for the year, we will be highlighting the trends and movements within death metal that we found to be the most significant, as well as our own personal top 15 death metal records on the year. Prepare yourself. Madness awaits.

Impureza – La Caída De Tonatiuh

There have been previous attempts at integrating flamenco elements into metal. There have even been successful, good attempts at doing so. However, there are few that have been successful at blending them seamlessly. This applies not just to flamenco, but any influence outside of metal. It’s either the case where a regular metal song suddenly erupts into an irrelevant genre break, or it’s barely a metal album. The latter case usually happens, for example, when jazz musicians get together and write an album that’s mostly in their own wheelhouse, with some minor metal elements. Even further, the most extreme of metal subgenres are usually spared these excesses. Enter Impureza, a band that skirts the line between progressive and technical death metal, and perfectly fits flamenco into that picture. The end result is just delightful.