Bleeding Through – Love Will Kill All

For those of you who’ve hung around the metalcore scene since the early 2000s, you have my respect. You’ve been through some real shit. Whether it’s the cringey downward spirals of the scene’s power players into mediocre, wannabe radio darlings or the lackluster output of quality records this side of the decade, things just ain’t the way they used to be. For everyone who jumped ship, word of a new Bleeding Through record may or may not be enough to pique your interest. We’ve seen Killswitch Engage, Underoath, Atreyu and a few other less-notable acts return with relatively disappointing efforts, so you wouldn’t be amiss to be little apprehensive about busting out the dingy sweatbands and studded belts, but if Love Will Kill All has any say in it, you might find yourself sitting on a little Facebook Marketplace goldmine.

Half-Life – Parkway Drive

Parkway Drive have come a long way since the days of all-ages, community center shows at which I became acquainted with them. For one thing—going by the banner picture above—drummer Ben Gordon is now rocking an impressively luscious set of golden locks, while guitarist Jeff Ling is showing his seniority…

In Vain – Currents

The five years that have passed since the release of Ænigma (2013) likely mean that the window of opportunity for In Vain and their phenomenal third outing to become anything more than curious blips on the progressive metal radar. Had the band come back in full force following that most…

Djent Was A Genre Full Of Great Debuts And Little Else

Djent had an explosive entrance into the world of heavy music, around the start of the decade. It was a truly exciting occurrence, with first-wave acts like Periphery, Animals As Leaders and Cloudkicker filtering the technically-driven progressive sound of acts like Meshuggah, Sikth, and those of the budding “Sumeriancore” movement, into something  altogether more accessible, while still retaining much of their forebears’ technical and progressive edge. Yet, like most new sub-genres, djent quickly devolved into pastiche and gave way to over saturation—perhaps a little bit quicker than most. Djent, it seems, has had a propperly ballistic trajectory, and—in 2017—as its momentum trails off, it’s hard to get excited about this once-promising phenomenon.

89 – Wall Chicken

You thought last week was salty? Try this week. Of course, we discuss the new Stray From The Path song and the reaction to it. Then Matt Skiba of Blink 182 and his witchcraft he inflicted upon Fyre Festival. Then Soundcloud’s imminent failure, and Chance the Rapper’s attempt at stalling that. Then Pandora’s closing up shop in AU and NZ. Then the traffic accident that lead to the death of Adrenaline Mob bassist David Zablidowsky. Wintersun’s Forest Seasons shenanigans never end. Fallujah vocalist Alex Hoffman left the band. Killswitch Engage vocalist Jesse Leach and his inane rant. Then some actual new music. New Cannabis Corpse track, and Sol Invicto going all members-club-only. Finally, we bring back the Rose FUNOral debacle. Also, we discuss Netflix’s Castlevania and Glow. Enjoy!

Rick Chapple of Devil Sold His Soul – The Heavy Blog Interview

During the mid-2000s, the UK hardcore and metal scene underwent a re-energisation of sorts due to the emergence of several bands who have since spearheaded the genres to modern popularity. Bands like Enter Shikari and Bring Me the Horizon resonated with mainstream crowds since their inceptions and have since established themselves as global institutions. On the other hand, Architects instantly occupied the forefront of an underground charge and, over the years, have also crossed over into popular realms. However, bubbling underneath the surface was (and still is) a whole scene of innovative, vital artists whose records define the country’s musical output at its finest, with albums that will undoubtedly stand the test of time among aficionados of heavy music. One such act is Devil Sold His Soul who, in this writer’s humble opinion, are one of the best bands the UK has ever birthed.

A Decade Of Deathcore: Suicide Silence’s The Cleansing

Like it or not, a whole bunch of the staff at Heavy Blog “grew up” on deathcore in the mid to late 2000’s. Some love to admit it and some loathe to—some didn’t listen to it at all because they were clearly more well-adjusted to life and stuff. With a decade of deathcore now (well and truly) behind us, it’s probably an appropriate time to look at some of the genre’s most notable releases in that time. As it’s 2017, let’s start with 2007 (well done, mathletes) and the first full length from California lyric shirt pioneers Suicide Silence. If your favourite deathcore release came out in 2006 then sorry, look elsewhere.

67 – The Critique Of Pure Shitpost

This episode is just too good. Seriously, just listen to it. What does it contain? Edgy cultural/political jokes, a history of black metal and racism, an extended cool people section shitposting on philosophers like Kant, and much more. I’ll just tag some of the relevant bands here for SEO purposes, and the left is at your own peril. Abandon all hope, we who enter here. Warbringer, Suicide Silence, As I Lay Dying, Dream Theater, Overkill, Nidingr feat Myrkur, Sikth, Megadeth, Angra, Killswitch Engage. There you go.