Exulansis – Sequestered Sympathy

“Arresting” is a word which should be used for music more often. That is just a convoluted way of saying that I wish more music was arresting. Since music accompanies me pretty much during everything I do, there’s a tendency for even some of the best stuff out there to…

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Hey! Listen to Gévaudan!

While England lies now in the throes of sedition and ugliness, there’s a certain air of history, myth, and folklore that you can get in almost no other place. Both due to the length of human settlement on the isles and to the literary penchant of more modern denizens of…

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Winterfylleth – The Hallowing of Heirdom

At an early age, I fell in love with the myths of England. It was a combination of spending two years there (and in the relative North of the country, near Wales, a place steeped in beauty and folklore), reading Tolkien and the beauty of myth, which is especially effective with teenagers. Moving away from there only made that connection stronger. That’s no surprise, considering that English myth is steeped in the ideas of “the other shore”, home sickness, and something lost. All that being considered, it’s a wonder I’m not a bigger Winterfylleth fan, an atmospheric black metal band that has made English legend its bread and butter. Now, they’ve released an album that immediately grabbed my attention; The Hallowing of Heirdom is a stripping away of their sound, leaving behind an acoustic core of longing, a sense of another world, and a deep connection with the legends I love.

The Anatomy Of: Winterfylleth

In case you missed it, Manchester’s premier atmospheric/pagan black metal act Winterfylleth released their sixth album The Hallowing of Heirdom last week, April 6th, 2018, through Spinefarm and Candlelight. Since their inception, the act’s atmospheric black metal sound has been espoused with majestic neofolk which made them a band to…

62 – Industry Shena-Nick-ans

Yay, we have a threesome! If we were youtube clickbait, I’d have to call this METAL PODCAST PRANK (GONE SEXUAL). Anyway, this week we have Nick around again, and as we are often wont to do, we talk about industry shenanigans with him. Namely the Nielsen report on 2016 music sales, Tidal’s new gimmick, some Facebook deathcore page scamming people, and then we go into some news. New music or whatever from Panopticon, Pyrrhon, Convulsing, Pallbearer, Good Tiger, and Wintersun (enjoy my rant on that). Also in our weekly Season of Mist worship, the One And All, Together, For Home album featuring Drudkh, Primordial, Winterfylleth and more. Then we talk about good double albums, what makes a live show good, and the shittiness of the notion of “female fronted” bands.

Listen As Season of Mist and Roman Sayenko Dig Deep Into the Folk Roots of Black Metal

Season of Mist teamed up in 2014 with Drudkh frontman Roman Sayenko to remedy the implicitness of folk tradition within black metal. Together, they gave us an underrated gem of an album called One and All, Together, for Home. It is nothing else but a collaboration album spanning various traditions, sounds and histories to shine a light on some of the folk music that acts as fuel for black metal. The roster includes the aforementioned Primordial, but also Haive, Winterfylleth, Kampfar and more. Together, they’ve compiled an album made up of a rich tapestry of styles, from true-to-source renditions of ancient songs to more metal oriented interpretations of said melodies. The guidelines for the contributing acts seem to have fast and loose and thus, the album features varied and disparate approaches, lending it a strong sense of personal, creative identity.