Fake It Until You Make It? Musical Authenticity and the Metal Musician

When in the studio, musicians always use some "tricks" to get a sound that isn't necessarily as achievable in a live setting. This is a pretty commonly known fact. It's not even a new thing. Since the 60s, bands have made music in the studio that doesn't reflect the process of how they actually play in person. As technology develops, more methods become available to the artists to achieve a more "perfect" sound, if they choose to use them. In the 50s and before, bands recorded performances together, in a single run through. Then they started recording each instrument separately, then split up songs into parts, then replaced some instruments with digital substitutes, used corrective techniques (both for pitch and timing) and recently, started performing at a slower tempo then speeding it up. These are the realities of recording. Whether they're acceptable or not is a hotly debated topic, and a recent even in the metal spheres brought the question to the forefront yet again. The 2016 Guitar Solo Contest, where guitarists were asked to perform over a track by John Browne of Monuments and submit a video of their recording, recently announced their winners. The prizes ranged from a Mayones guitar, Mesa amps, Bare Knuckle Pickups and more. Here's where it gets complicated. One of the winners was a performance that was clearly heavily edited.

17 – Mixing It Up With Eyal Levi

Welcome back to HPIHC! This week we have a very special guest! The guitarist of Daath, famed producer and now businessman Eyal Levi! He joins us this week to inform us about a lot of production-related questions we'be been discussing for a while, and also how he's taken a step ahead of the paradigm by building his own service (Nail the Mix) and innovated the process of teaching people about production. Then, Eden and I go into our usual discussions about news, including Skuggsja's London exhibition, The Iranian metal band Confess facing execution for their lyrics, the 36th anniversary of the Black Sabbath album, and, well, our usual weekly Tidal shenanigans. Finally, we do our opinion time, this week tackling "good for its time" albums and, on a related note, Metallica.