What’s Up Punks, June 2019

It seems like we’re entering a summer of revival and renewal for the punk scene. Coming on the heels of new and very solid efforts from the likes of Bad Religion and Bouncing Souls we have a slew of new releases from godfathers of the scene debuting now or in…

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What’s Up Punks? May 2019, part 2

So here we are with the second installment of this month’s cavalcade of punk music in just about every style imaginable. Punk is, after all, as much a mindset as a musical style, right? Right. There’s a lot to get to so I won’t hold you up. Dig in, enjoy.…

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What’s Up Punks? – April 2019

March turned out to be a massive month for solid releases all over the punk spectrum so let’s just dive in, first with the albums that need checking out and then the singles and EPs that have been spinning here at Wannabe Manor. Albums The Maine – You Are OK…

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Ithaca – The Language of Injury

“I’m not here to make friends.”  As statements of Ithaca’s intent go, this screamed refrain is about as concise as they come.  Ithaca have been a near-constant presence in London’s teeming hardcore scene for some years now. Finally, after two EPs and countless shows, their hard work has been rewarded with the…

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Portrayal of Guilt – Let Pain Be Your Guide

My initial impressions of portrayal of guilt, mostly based off their self-titled EP, were that the band bore compelling similarities to You Fail Me-era Converge.  Holistically, both releases invoke the sense of urgency in the aftermath of trauma (something arguably still present in Let Pain Be Your Guide); more specifically,…

Foxing – Nearer My God

We often find ourselves in ruts. Maybe you’re in a job you don’t like, so you gain new skills and work hard to find a job you do. Sometimes you’re in a bad relationship that either needs to be fixed or end. Often you get into a position where you…

Vattnet – Vattnet

Starting over is not the easiest thing in the world, but it does have its benefits. There is freedom in going back to the point of inception because there are no preconceived notions of what is to come. Even if people remember what came before, that was the past and this is the future, which stops for no one. When Vattnet, previously known to us as the post-black metal band Vattnet Viskar, lost one of their two founding members, they saw an opportunity to go back to the beginning and build from the ground up. Cleaving their band name in half, they looked toward the future and decided to make a self-titled album album that, in the words of guitarist Chris Alfieri, “we could listen to forever, even if no one else liked it.”