No, I’m not sorry for that title. OK, I’m a little sorry. Anyway, I’ve been a big proponent of the idea that, if you’re going to be cheesy, you might as well be passionate about it. Kyros a perfect example of that. The band are gearing up to release their new album, Celexa Dreams, this June. The entire thing is a giant love letter to that sweet (and sometimes painful) time when progressive rock bands like Yes, Rush, and others were experimenting with the synth-pop sounds of the 80’s and early 90’s, creating the by-now dubious genre of alternative rock. The result is an eclectic and well written album filled with tasty bass, prominent synths, and ethereal, evocative vocals. Your own first taste is “Rumour”, premiering here today. Head on down below to go back to the age of the VCR and the LCD monitor.

Right off the bat, from both the video and the music, you can see the aesthetic I was eluding to above. What’s nice about Kyros is, as the maxim I quoted above dictates, is that they take this aesthetic seriously; whether it’s the impeccably crafted synth tones (which give off the kind of saccharine sound inherent to this style of music but are rich enough to offer depth as well) or the style and production value of the video, this is not just a gimmick for Kyros. They deeply love this style of music and you can hear it in all sorts of place. Check out the bass lick close to the four minute mark for example (pure, groovy pleasure) or the vocal high notes which are replete through this track’s chorus’s; they all resonate with style and a dedication to the kind of music at play here.

Celexa Dreams itself is also interesting, channeling more of the energies that pump through “Rumour” but also taking them in interesting directions. There are more melancholy tracks on it, more ambient sounds, and plenty of variety to keep your interest going beyond the original novelty of the sound. Head on over to the band’s website to get more info on the album ahead of its June 19th release; just don’t forget your torn up jeans.

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