Good Vibrations — A Day To Remember Are More Metal Than Your Band

2009 was a landmark year for me when it came to music. Releases from Every Time I Die and The Black Dahlia Murder were the soundtrack to my first experience of living on my own and, slotted somewhere between the two, Homesick by A Day To Remember became a “guilty pleasure”. The dyed in the wool metal head in me was conflicted. Torn even. I knew that the pop driven choruses and “she left me, boo hoo” lyrics were something I should have already got past but the songs were just too catchy to ignore. What business did a pop punk band have dropping savage, infectious breakdowns all over their material? Why do I still listen to this band, unironically? Because A Day To Remember are metal as fuck and I’ll fight you after class on the football field if you disagree.

44 – Eden Got Eaten

In true soap-opera-that-outlived-its-course fashion, we’re replacing the actor who plays the part of Eden with David Wu of Cyborg Octopus! Yeah, he’s been here before, exactly 10 episodes ago!First, we talk about how artists feel about criticism, delve into the creative process a bit, and while we cover some of the same ground we did before, we end up in a different place! Then, we do the news, talking about Oathbearer, An Endless Sporadic, Metallica, Dance Gavin Dance, The Depression Sessions (The Acacia Strain, Thy Art Is Murder, Fit For An Autopsy), Virvum, Ninjaspy and Devin Townsend. Also, check David’s new channel he alluded to last time, RiffShop!

Thy Art Is Murder/The Acacia Strain/Fit For An Autopsy – The Depression Sessions

Sure, metal can certainly terrify listeners with occult imagery and sheer gore, but delving deep into one’s own personal neuroses can often take someone down a much darker path. Inexplicable sadness is often a much more relatable and ubiquitous demon than anything you’d see smeared across a Cannibal Corpse cover (not that there’s anything wrong with that). For that reason alone, it’s become a much more prevalent topic amongst death metal’s most notorious and now unjustly-reviled subgenre. You couldn’t have picked a better title for deathcore’s most anticipated EP of the year, and you probably couldn’t have picked a better batch of current bands to tackle the theme of depression either. Thy Art Is Murder, The Acacia Strain and Fit For An Autopsy are collectively as soul-bearing as they’ve ever been, and they’re still churning out brain-melting breakdowns in the process.