Morbid Angel – Kingdoms Disdained

After finally listening to Kingdoms Disdained, its clear that guitarist Trey Azagthoth’s deterioration as a songwriter has been a key, unaddressed factor that’s affected Morbid Angel’s recent output. While he may have written some of death metal’s greatest riffs during the band’s heyday, Kingdoms Disdained is the best case study thus far in terms of demonstrating Azagthoth’s slipping capability as the driving force of Morbid Angel’s sound. It was easy to overlook Heretic given how generally forgettable it was, and the predominant critiques of Illud Divinum Insanus revolved more around the band’s decision making than anything else. But now that Morbid Angel have entered into the perfect setup for a successful comeback, it’s difficult to overlook how complacent Azagthoth’s songwriting is across the entirety of Kingdoms Disdained. There’s no denying the album is an incomparable improvement over their industrial metal excursions, but it’s also difficult to avoid comparing the album’s aggressively average delivery with the milestone records that have preceded it in the band’s discography

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 10/13/17

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.net through your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

Death’s Door – September 2017

Welcome to Death’s Door! Wipe your feet on the mat. Don’t want any oil getting on the floor. Yes, you heard me correctly. Oil. OIL. Everywhere. I remember a time when Hell was just covered in blood, now we’ve got these god-forsaken machines running around everywhere. Oh, but they don’t have SOULS they said. Tell that to my hellhound. All dogs do indeed go somewhere, and it isn’t always to the pearly gates. Anyhoo, technical death metal is king of the castle in 2017, and there isn’t much we can do about it. Sentient robots, alien lifeforms, and all that jazz. What a year it’s been, and frankly the amount of amazing music still to be heard troubles me. I don’t have time for this. I have shit to do. But here we are, discussing another ferocious month of death metal insanity. Grab a bone chair and make yourself a Bloody Mary (she won’t mind), there’s some good stuff to cover.

Arkaik – Nemethia

Death metal in the current era is unfortunately met with a divide among generational fans, effectively causing a bit of an old-head vs youth situation. If you’re just getting into the genre now, you’re probably brought into this world by bands such as Fit for an Autopsy, Thy Art is…

The Celtic Connection – Bones, Chugs and Harmonies

There’s nothing quite like a great sandwich. Whether it’s cookies either side of creme, cold cuts stuffed in slices of bread or earnest, driving hard rock with heart stuck between two slabs of dirty, bludgeoning death. We’re going with the latter on this weeks Celtic Connection with Scottish and Irish produce, as per. It tickles my pickle that I get to cover three bands with nothing shared other than their red haired heritage. Sure, the two Scots acts may share the same rough area but they couldn’t be any further apart in terms of taste, style and fans. Throw in some low end loving Irish folks and hey, we’ve got a party on our hands.

Inanimate Existence – Underneath a Melting Sky

Sometimes you have to take a step back to move forward. Counter intuitive, yes. But as I’ve progressed through life I’ve found this to be true. Perhaps related to a career, where one has to go back to the drawing board to re-learn concepts long forgotten from some slept-through college lecture. Or in one’s personal life, where sometimes rehashing old wounds is the only way to progress past them. Music often falls into this same trajectory. Sometimes the alteration of sound works against a band rather than for them. While I am an enormous proponent of progression and change in music, how a band decides to engage in new musical and thematic concepts matters. Some do it right (Artificial Brain, Ingurgitating Oblivion), while some do not (latter-day Metallica, Morbid Angel). Yes, the parenthetical suggestions used to prove my point here are infinitely debatable, but I would make the argument that not all of these bands’ forays into uncharted territory worked in their favor. So it’s nice to see a band keep to their progressive trajectory, but pull from their back catalog elements that make their sound more enjoyable. Inanimate Existence are one of those bands, and with Underneath a Melting Sky have further perfected their sound by staying adventurous while simultaneously plundering the most essential elements of their past records.