Half-Life: Trivium

Trivium are a band in a unique position. They exploded onto the scene very early on, accruing a lot of fans and haters simultaneously. After putting out an album that helped define a generation, they stepped back from the spotlight a bit, but their most interesting material actually came out…

The Anatomy Of: Vexes

Surely by now you’ve all heard some of the buzz surrounding the up-and-coming hard rock / post-hardcore group Vexes. Featuring former members of A Life Once Lost, Vessl, Fury of Five, and Downstage, the act are gearing up to release their debut album Ancient Geometry this week, and if you’re a fan…

113 – Clever And Funny Episode Title

Unfortunately I don’t have a fun or a dab-inducing dank reference for the episode title this time. Just a regular old episode. We discuss new music. Mike Shinoda’s EP, Justin Timberlake’s album, Cyclamen’s new album, Misery Index’s single, Judas Priest’s new song, yndi halda’s EP, and August Burns Red’s Messengers Remixed. We also talk about Matt Heavy from Trivium streaming his practice and gaming sessions, and how Best Buy and Target are trying to get rid of CDs. Devin Townsend is quitting DTP, and we discovered this Metallica show that was filmed in Antarctica. Finally, cool people time. The new Netflix cyberpunk show Altered Carbon is amazing. Also Celeste and Subnautica are cool games.

Trigger – Cryogenesis

Enter Trigger, a young band hailing from Australia, the land of too much sun and great metal. Cryogenesis, released way back when in July of 2017, is chock full of the blurring of the lines between thrash and power that we referenced in the opening paragraph. I pounced on this album once realizing it wasn’t just a power metal album with impressive hooks in tow but also a science fiction conceptual epic. Under eventual and multiple listens, it quickly became apparent that Cryogenesis was a good album and an impressive effort for a second release but also an album which exemplifies many of the pitfalls of its sub-genre. At its core, Cryogenesis is motivated by big choruses and fast riffing but suffers from a muddled middle section, leaving the listener yearning for more.

Morbid Angel – Kingdoms Disdained

After finally listening to Kingdoms Disdained, its clear that guitarist Trey Azagthoth’s deterioration as a songwriter has been a key, unaddressed factor that’s affected Morbid Angel’s recent output. While he may have written some of death metal’s greatest riffs during the band’s heyday, Kingdoms Disdained is the best case study thus far in terms of demonstrating Azagthoth’s slipping capability as the driving force of Morbid Angel’s sound. It was easy to overlook Heretic given how generally forgettable it was, and the predominant critiques of Illud Divinum Insanus revolved more around the band’s decision making than anything else. But now that Morbid Angel have entered into the perfect setup for a successful comeback, it’s difficult to overlook how complacent Azagthoth’s songwriting is across the entirety of Kingdoms Disdained. There’s no denying the album is an incomparable improvement over their industrial metal excursions, but it’s also difficult to avoid comparing the album’s aggressively average delivery with the milestone records that have preceded it in the band’s discography

The Anatomy Of – Nullingroots

Yesterday, I reviewed Nullingroots’ Into the Grey, a review in which I lamented getting the word about this band out there so late in the year. Their blend of progressive and post black metal is really something to be in awe of, resulting in an exceptional album. Clearly, there’s a lot going on in the background of such a band and getting a look at their influences would probably be a varied and fascinating affair. Thus, when the opportunity to do just that presented itself, we jumped on it and here we are, posting their Anatomy Of post! The below list, compiled by vocalist/guitarist Cameron Boesch, contains some expected picks (like post black metal geniuses, Lantlos) and some which make sense only in retrospect (like the present of a thrashy riff or two on the album fitting in with the Metallica influence).

Love Letter – Iron Maiden’s Powerslave

The year is 1984 and Iron Maiden are in an interesting position. Hot off the tails of two great releases and their first major tour, the band are starting to feel the pressures and joys of success at the same time. This is a crucible in which many bands have faltered, unable to reproduce the original sound which garnered them their first modicums of recognition. Line-ups shake, creative differences being to tear at the structure of the sound, as each member brings forth their own vision as to what the future should contain. In this situation, there were many divergent paths down which Iron Maiden’s story could have gone; they had already faced several major line-up changes and their future was anything but secure. They could have easily broken up or lost track of what made their first albums work.

But, instead, they made Powerslave.