120 – Converge Are An Up And Coming Band

Eden is away doing [thing] this week, so we have Cody instead. Of course, I proceed to troll Cody by making the podcast awkward. But hey, we discuss stuff too! We spend a good amount of time discussing Ihsahn’s disappointing take on the recent happenings in metal and his complicity (including Emperor drummer Faust’s actions). Then how lukewarm we are about the new Dimmu Borgir song. Then the new Alkaloid song, which we both love. Then I try to convince Cody to get into Augury (he messaged me after the episode saying it clicked). We comment on the unfortunate passing of the Cave In bassist Caleb Scofield (crowdfunder here). Finally, we talk about the excellent Toilet ov Hell article on reactionaries in metal and how the scene has become such a mess of edgelords. Then, cool people time. We discuss Cody’s favorite movies and then some other random ones, like The Godfather, A Scanner Darkly, Synecdoche New York, Adaptation, Stranger Than Fiction, Premium Rush, The Raid, City of Violence, and more.

The Anatomy Of: Kaoteon

It’s always thrilling to find extreme metal in unlikely places. Labenese (by way of Amsterdam) blackened death metal act Kaoteon are embracing their status as unique cultural representatives by writing some truly compelling music while smashing middle-eastern stereotypes. Regardless of locality though, Kaoteon crushes. Spearheaded by duo Anthony Kaoteon (guitar) and…

Love Letter – Cobalt’s Gin

I distinctly remember where I heard Radiohead’s Kid A for the first time. It was on a road trip, driving with my parents and siblings to Yellowstone National Park. The mostly desolate and flat landscape surrounding most of our seemingly interminable drive from Colorado and through some of the most…

Get your Corpsepaint on with Mist Of Misery’s “Hymn to Silence”

I’ve always been someone with a soft spot for symphonic black metal, ever since first discovering Emperor and their classic album In the Nightside Eclipse, and have had an on-again, off-again infatuation with the genre and it’s eccentricities ever since.  One of my biggest complaints about the genre, however, was that…

DSKNT – PhSPHR Entropy

The concept of space in album production is an interesting and record-defining one. The way in which an album is constructed, coupled with the emphasis placed in the production room on each instrument, noise, and tone, can have a drastic impact on the way an album sounds and the manner…

Be Prog! My Friend Part II or The Long Night Filled With Hope

Prepped and pumped from day one, armed with the knowledge of where the best food and spots were, we entered Poble Espanyol. The setlist promised to be stacked with some of my favorite acts and my expectations were high. I was worried about being disappointed but it was just a nagging voice in the back of my head; my spirit was frivolous and I allowed myself to imagine crazy scenarios of far fetched and perfect set-lists, incredible and soul lifting shows and what have you. Those rampant expectations were all met and exceed, as the second day proved to be one of the best musical experiences of my life. Venue, company, performance, crowds, bands, all combined in that perfect, harmonious way which is usually resolved for dreams and erupted on to the scene. But let us start in the beginning and chart this journey towards the end, an unbelievable catharsis at night.

Hey! Listen to Gregorio Franco!

When one thinks about synthwave they more often than not conjure up images of neon landscapes made up of transparent grids, sunsets, beaches, palm trees, fast cars and anything else that may fit into such an aesthetic. That said, one does not tend to think about upside down crosses, demons, serial killers and an overall sense of evil in turn. However, for every genre that has ever existed there lies a much darker side, a subgenre which turns things on their head and produces a much more heavier sound in response. For synthwave that would be darkwave or darksynth, either seem to be interchangeable for the most part, with well-known acts such as Carpenter Brut, GosT, Perturbator, and Dance with the Dead carrying the torch. Of course, for every well-known act, there are those who are scratching, clawing and going through hell to be noticed, many of whom were influenced by those already leading that proverbial charge.

Gregorio Franco is one of those dark souls of the synth and, if what he’s produced thus far is any indication, he is not only one to keep an ear to the ground on but one to keep an eye out for as well.

Wreche – Wreche

Black metal has arguably the most eclectic genre palette in the metal pantheon. Though simple at its core, the genre’s aesthetics have been applied to countless concepts and shaped to include a multitude of other genres and accompanying instrumentation. Yet, the guitar still remains the one constant element in nearly all iterations of the genre, whether as a lo-fi wall of distortion or thundering gallop over equally blistering blast beats. It’s a rare occurrence when a band decides to forgo this six string staple; the only example this reviewer is aware of is Botanist, who instead opt for hammered dulcimers and harmonium. But when a guitar-less black metal album does surface, fans of the genre typically take notice to see if the experiment pays off. As such, the union of piano and drums in unholy matrimony on Wreche’s self-titled debut makes for an intriguing experience that’s deserving of at least an exploratory listen.