An Autumn For Crippled Children – Eternal

Shamefully, it’s still all too easy to allow a new record from Netherland-based black metal enigmas An Autumn For Crippled Children slip by unnoticed. Last year’s stellar The Long Goodbye garnered praise on this website, and the radio silence from other outlets sparked a brief think-piece bemoaning how, in a post-Sunbather world, An Autumn For Crippled Children still garner little fanfare despite doing things within the post-black metal genre that are incredibly fascinating, if not groundbreaking in the band’s oeuvre of going to such extremes in fusing black metal with bright New Wave and shoegaze melodies. A year later, and we’re back at square one: a brand new record, Eternal, unceremoniously dropped into Bandcamp with almost no one talking about it. Never underestimate the power of PR, kids.

A Hard Day’s Night Writing Symphonies of Sickness – How the Fab Four Tell the Tale of Extreme Metal

When four young lads first got together in Liverpool, they had no idea that some enthusiastic yelping and screaming, two guitars, bass and drums could spark a revolution. They didn’t suspect that four working class chaps could form a rock ‘n’ roll band and make a set of records that would influence countless bands and encompass multiple styles, and write songs that people would still be enjoying decades later. This band, of course, is Carcass. Yes, there was that OTHER band, The Beatles, who did all those things, too. But this is an extreme metal blog, and in this existentially hellish alternate universe, Carcass may well be The Beatles.

As Carcass prepares to undertake a tour with “love ‘em or hate ‘em” blackgaze critical darlings Deafheaven, some of you may be wondering how we got here. Well, keep in mind that The Beatles’ own John Lennon spent a lot of time with more out-there avantish types in the 70s, too. He cranked out some borderline unlistenable noise with Yoko Ono which is, frankly, far less palatable than Deafheaven; but there’s admittedly a lot of screeching in both. If you’re surprised that Carcass made this choice, well, shows how much you know about Carcass.

Wait—John Lennon and Deafheaven what?

Hey! Listen To Frozen Ocean!

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: black metal has had an amazing past few years, at least in terms of artists redefining what the genre can do. We’ve had Behemoth come out with what is arguably their best studio album to date, The Satanist; the so-called “blackgaze”…

Primitive Weapons – The Future Of Death

Getting near that time of year when music critics start panicking that they might have already found their album of the year, the likes of Primitive Weapons show up. Guitars slung low and played violently, leaving a wanton trail of aural oblivion. People desperately trying to come up with a new last.fm tag for this type of music. Opinions will be divided, some will naysay but a few of these critics (from all walks and stages of life, mind you) will start to gush lavish praise on this magnificent entry into the world of heavy. It’s already begun? Well of course it has! This is The Future Of Death.

Hey! Listen to Cranial!

Post metal/atmospheric metal has an annoyingly ubiquitous sort of feel these days, doesn’t it? It seems as though every Friday we see yet another release of a band following in the footsteps of a Isis or Deafhaven, and more and more these releases continue to disappoint me, either through ad nauseam repeitition with little progression, or just uninspired songwriting. But I am here to say that although these releases won’t stop for a few more, there do exist some really good, post metal bands, although they’re very underground. In this case, I refer to Cranial and their debut EP Dead Ends, released by Germany’s Moment of Collapse Records.

Fuath – I

For a musician like Andy Marshall, whose experimentation ranges greatly on his Saor releases, this is a loving pause and meditation on a style of music that has considerably progressed in the past two decades. If you like standard black metal, or are even just starting out in the genre, this is an album to at least listen to. It offers none of the frills of Saor, and it is unapologetic of that fact. One must simply take it as it is: solid, traditional, black metal.

WRVTH: Top 10 of 2015

As you could probably guess, this week is all about discussing our favorite albums from 2015. However, we decided to have a few special guests also discuss their top 10 albums from the year, and why they placed where they did. This week, we have not one, but all five…