Clutch – Book of Bad Decisions

Like Neil Fallon (the legendary vocalist for Clutch, in case you somehow got lost and wondered onto this review without knowing that) on track “How to Shake Hands”, I know that what the people want is straight talk and no jive. So let’s get right down to facts. Fact: Clutch have never released a bad album. Even the somewhat denigrated Jam Room contains some straight bangers and the rest of their discography moves between good and great. Fact: no one has fun like Clutch. There’s just something about the mix of super deep American mythology (fact: “White’s Ferry” still gives me chills), their unwillingness to take themselves too seriously and the earnestness of their long career that is unmatched in the annals of rock n’ roll. Fact: Book of Bad Decisions is another excellent release from one of America’s best, and, for all their popularity and success, one of the most underrated, bands.

Mos Generator – Shadowlands

There’s a virtue to artists who don’t try to reinvent the wheel with every new release, instead focusing on refining their core sound and musical ideas and themes. Mos Generator have spent the last eighteen years doing just that to great effect on numerous albums, EP’s and splits with like minded bands…

Boss Keloid – Melted on the Inch

Enter Boss Keloid. Their sophomore release, Herb Your Enthusiasm, was well belied by its name as it put them on our radar; their music was progressive stoner personified, all treble, fuzz and smokey haze. Honestly, we were expecting more of the same from Melted on the Inch and were content with that. Their brand of stoner mixed with sludge was to our liking. But, instead, Melted on the Inch threw us quite a bit of a curve ball. On it, Keloid have reached back into their progressive rock roots and brought forth a sound which, while not a complete stranger to their established tones, is certainly something new. The result is an album where composition is way more varied than before, synth tones rule the day, the vocals are non traditional and the overall theme seems much changed. Insert a weed joke here, something about breeds? Let’s just get to it.

’68 – Two Parts Viper

With time, Josh Scogin will be able to release music without it immediately being compared to his work in The Chariot. That time isn’t upon us yet, as fans of the Georgia legends still hanker for them, tearfully screaming “long live” at anyone and everyone within earshot. The second release from Scogin’s stripped down ’68 project should help these lost souls in finding new comforts, away from the mayhem and maelstrom that The Chariot offered. Two Parts Viper is one part Southern Americana, one part ex-The Chariot Josh Scogin and one part wonderfully over the top rock and roll. But 2014’s Humor And Sadness was made up of much and such the same measurements. Has the sound evolved enough for ’68 to finally become a stand alone entity?

Post Rock Post – Stone From the Sky

A formula for making Stone From the Sky: put your hand on the dial that says “Camel” and then slow it way down. OK, you went too far and now you’ve made Earth. Bring it back up a notch, just a little bit. Wait, whoa, you went too far and now we have Cambrian Explosion. Slow it down again just a tiny bit and there we go! Stone From the Sky are like stoner rock that’s passed out in a field of post rock poppies, intoxicating delays doing some very weird things to its perceptions of timing, tone, and delivery. Their album, aptly named Fuck the Sun, is all rolling hills and wide meadows, a sojourn in the diffused light of some other source of illumination.

Let A Thousand Arms Show You The Meaning Of “Erosion”

Has there ever been a more aptly named compilation that A Thousand Arms’s Erosion? Probably named, as this compilation is filled with tons of geographically diverse stoner, doom, and everything in between. You have your feedback based meditations on the farthest reaches of space/the psyche, the heavier thundering of crashing waves on cliffs and the decidedly dipped in the good leaf. Most of all though, A Thousand Arms continues its efforts to bring to the light of day more obscure and less optimally located bands, shinning a light on some names you’re bound to find surprising and, hopefully, pleasing. As the compilation, which is divided into two sides, features tons of music, we’ve taken the liberty of being your guides. Let’s get started!