Anti-Flag – 20/20 Vision

It’s an election year in the United States, arguably the most divisive election year in the country’s history, if not ever. I (and many others) predicted we’d see a glut of politically motivated punk rock afte... Read More...

Best of 1979

Heavy Blog is Heavy is ten years old. When Jimmy Rowe first started this blog, I doubt he imagined that it would become what it is today; I doubt anybody around back then imagined it. It was special for music ... Read More...

Death and the Penguin – Anomie

In 2018, the following sentence is a confession: I still really like brit-rock. Don't get me wrong, the genre deserved everything it got; under the guise of alternative music and a rebel spirit, it connived with corporate interests to create some of the most plastic and regurgitated music ever made, hiding it all under the selfsame guise of edgy counter culture. But I was confessing; I still really like it. I like the morose style of vocals, I like the straight-forward guitar music, and I like the thin veneer of British depression and snark which coats it. And I love it when all of those elements are mixed with modern music, especially progressive rock. That's a pretty specific formula but, luckily for me, Death and the Penguin have been working at it for a while now.

No Heroes in New England // Week of 7/17/16

With bands like Trap Them, Jerry’s Kids, and Converge all hailing from the northeast coast, it’s unsurprising to see why hardcore is a term almost synonymous with New England. But it didn’t always start out like that; due to the efforts of punk zines and record stores like Newbury Comics (who almost single-handedly birthed Boston Hardcore), angry music has been able thrive and blossom.