71 – The Podcasters Who Come To Steal The Attention Of The Listeners

Alright, so this week we talk about Nile. We do a balls deep segment on them. Also, we talk about some weekly stuff too. Alestorm's hilarious trolling with their 50 euro edition of their upcoming album, Disillusion's Patreon campaign, Suicide Silence complaining about their album not being well received, Pelagic Records (in general), and metal youtubers, namely Rob Scallon, Ten Second Songs, Paschalis Theotokis and RichaadEB. Oh, also there's a new Mastodon song too.

On Extended Ranges and Low Tunings, 4 Years Later

A few years back, I wrote a piece on the negativity towards extended range guitars in metal. You can find that piece here. The extended range guitar, which is loosely defined as anything that has more strings/frets/range than your average 6-string-24-fret-standard-scale guitar. We all know the deal. Four years ago, with the peak of djent and generally a new strain of progressive metal, extended range guitars were emerging in the mainstream of metal. Of course, just like any other change in the metal scene, a large amount of people reacted rather negatively to this. There was a portion of the scene that embraced this, and that lead to a variety of creative and innovative bands like Native Construct (8 strings), Dissipate (9 strings), Coma Cluster Void (10 strings) and so many more. After these years, are people more accepting of the movement now? What changed? Let's take a look at it.

Let Yourself Be Huge – Why Success In Modern Metal Is All About Inclusivity

No band is an island. At the end of the day, music as we know it today wouldn't exist without the unique marriage between the people making the music and their fans. The relationship is often a complicated one: pre-supposing a simple, two way street in which the artist gives the fans music and they, in turn, give them adoration, money and fame is naive. It's also highly irrelevant to metal. Beyond the few, rare names (a lot of which belong to an older and, sadly, dying generation), metal hasn't been about the megastar for decades now. The field is too saturated, too filled with great acts. Continuing to play the game and hoping to "get big" is a fool's cause; you most likely won't fill stadiums, won't sell platinum records and won't win that perfect record deal (which, by the way, doesn't exist).