Titan to Tachyons – Cactides

Sometimes, the only soundtrack for my present moment is an album that can do all the talking. By that, I mean the kind of records full of dense jams that are effortless to vibe along to, especially since each new listen always seems to offer a new perspective. If you’ve…

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tētēma – necroscape

Is there anything Mike Patton won’t try? My own limited collection of his music includes traditional Italian pop (Mondo Cane), off-kilter alt-rock (Tomahawk), a live album of avant-garde sludge (Millennium Monsterwork 2000), artsy chamber music inspired by Romantic era composers (Romances), and whatever he and John Zorn are doing on…

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Anatomy Of – Soldat Hans

Looking at the influences that made Soldat Hans happen sheds a bit more light on where the band members come from when approaching these issues; many of the acts listed below tap into this same desire to feel, face and excise such emotions in a healthy and productive way. Especially noteworthy is the wide range of artists presented below. Most of them have some melancholic or even depressive edge but they take different approaches in expressing these edges. Thus, we get a glance into how a diverse sound such as Soldat Hans was forged and the many places in other music from which it came. Enjoy and don’t forget to spin Es Taut when you feel up to it; it’s a ride you should experience at least once.

Dead Cross – Dead Cross

Over a decade since the last Fantômas record’s release, drum kit demolisher Dave Lombardo and anomaly of human nature Mike Patton reunite for Dead Cross, a project that brings in Retox’s Mike Crain on guitar and Justin Pearson on bass. Dead Cross originally did not feature Patton on vocals, originally…

Pryapisme – Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium

Instrumental music makes more room for the listener by opening up the palette—there are no lyrics that cue the listener how to feel. Whether this is true of extreme metal and the frequently unintelligible lyrics is arguable, though the titles and style of vocal delivery gives a pretty solid idea of what’s being communicated. This same openness can make describing or quantifying instrumental music difficult—a bit like translating poetry. Something inevitably gets lost.

Some bands are, by their very nature, divisive. These bands are often idiosyncratic in their approach and tend to generate strong opinions; in short, you love ‘em or hate ‘em. Pryapisme, who have delivered another madcap romp with their new album, Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium, are one of those bands.