What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 8/12/16

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made withtapmusic.netthrough your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

42 – Philosopher’s Guide To The Galaxy

Yeah, this week’s dank number fact is pretty obvious. Also, finally we introduce “Bullshit Philosophy Corner” as an official segment! Oh, we also talk about metal. Stuff like Morbid Angel, The HAARP Machine, From First To Last (and Skrillex), Oddland, Opeth, Jinjer, Defeated Sanity, Carnifex, The Dillinger Escape Plan, Equipoise, Alcest and Cortexiphan. Also some dumb top 50 list. Then we do two topics, namely bands that “you had to be there/then to get”, and how fans fixate on members of bands who have passed away. Enjoy!

Fake It Until You Make It? Musical Authenticity and the Metal Musician

When in the studio, musicians always use some “tricks” to get a sound that isn’t necessarily as achievable in a live setting. This is a pretty commonly known fact. It’s not even a new thing. Since the 60s, bands have made music in the studio that doesn’t reflect the process of how they actually play in person. As technology develops, more methods become available to the artists to achieve a more “perfect” sound, if they choose to use them. In the 50s and before, bands recorded performances together, in a single run through. Then they started recording each instrument separately, then split up songs into parts, then replaced some instruments with digital substitutes, used corrective techniques (both for pitch and timing) and recently, started performing at a slower tempo then speeding it up. These are the realities of recording. Whether they’re acceptable or not is a hotly debated topic, and a recent even in the metal spheres brought the question to the forefront yet again. The 2016 Guitar Solo Contest, where guitarists were asked to perform over a track by John Browne of Monuments and submit a video of their recording, recently announced their winners. The prizes ranged from a Mayones guitar, Mesa amps, Bare Knuckle Pickups and more. Here’s where it gets complicated. One of the winners was a performance that was clearly heavily edited.

Rest Among Ruins – Fugue

Mike Semesky is an obvious favorite around these parts; cool guy, workhorse of a musician, a general font of talent. Nobody can seem to get enough of him. From his time with The HAARP Machine and a one-album stint with Intervals, the current Raunchy vocalist brings forth his own passion…

Intervals – A Voice Within

The aptly titled A Voice Within sees the band adopting a sound akin to the likes of Periphery and The Human Abstract, wherein technically-minded musicians craft songs packed with haunting vocal hooks and melodies. That sort of style definitely isn’t new to the genre of metal, but Intervals’ striking coming-of-age in their debut exceeds expectation and makes great strides in their development all while being one hell of a listening experience comparable to a modernized incarnation of Van Halen raised on metalcore.