Post Rock Post // August 2018

Praise be, after hearing my complaints about the paucity of quality releases in July, the post-rock gods have smiled favorably upon us and have brought us good fortune as the hellish days of summer (hopefully, please, have mercy on my pale self) slowly fade into the crisper and bountiful days of autumn. In fact, it’s possible that there were simply too many releases of note in August for us to actually cover properly. We can’t win, evidently. But no matter what you all win as we talk about some really fantastic music that’s worth sticking into your earholes. So let’s hop to it, shall we?

Release Day Roundup – 8/31/18

Each month, we always seem to come to the same conclusion when it comes to our Editors’ Picks column: Friday release days open the floodgates and unleash a seemingly endless stream of quality new music. But while some of our Editors and Contributors sit down gleefully each week to dive into this newly stocked treasure…

Post Rock Post – 1099

While our Post Rock Post series may suggest otherwise, several of us on staff not named Nick or Eden also keep up on the genre’s latest offerings. I still remember being blown away by Mogwai’s Come On Die Young back in college and slowly pulling back the layers of post-rock’s back catalog of…

Anatomy Of – Soldat Hans

Looking at the influences that made Soldat Hans happen sheds a bit more light on where the band members come from when approaching these issues; many of the acts listed below tap into this same desire to feel, face and excise such emotions in a healthy and productive way. Especially noteworthy is the wide range of artists presented below. Most of them have some melancholic or even depressive edge but they take different approaches in expressing these edges. Thus, we get a glance into how a diverse sound such as Soldat Hans was forged and the many places in other music from which it came. Enjoy and don’t forget to spin Es Taut when you feel up to it; it’s a ride you should experience at least once.

Wolf King – Loyal to the Soil

Crossover genres are the best to write about because different trigger phrases and keywords open up in the lexicon of the review. Adjectives usually reserved for black metal get to rear their ugly heads in relation to a thrash record. Images writers love to use for hardcore get to pop…