Weeping Skulls – Weeping Skulls

Don’t ever try and argue with someone that grindcore is music. It really isn’t. The genre is forever teetering on being one tin can snare from sounding like a washing machine full of cutlery. The “anti-music” logo exists for a reason, after all. Tonality, melody, harmony… all thrown aside for…

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Total Fucking Destruction – #USA4TFD

What does one do when the genre-defining band they’ve played in for years, disbands? Most will pack up their instruments and kit, settling into another grind altogether – regular, boring ass working life. Not Richard Hoak. During the final days of Brutal Truth’s existence, Hoak obviously decided he hadn’t had enough. The melting pot of blasts and wicked arrangements in his mind finding a new home in Total Fucking Destruction. Nearly twenty years after the first release under this name, we find ourselves in a time where grindcore is more important than ever. It’s always been political, but the platform is sometimes a bit wobbly. Not in this case. #USA4TFD is a viral musical statement that no one is sharing. Yet.

The Anatomy Of – Bleeth

I’m honestly warming up to the idea of using this series to introduce you to new bands; after all, what description of the band’s music could ever live up to the band themselves talking about the influences which made it be? With Bleeth, fresh of the release of their debut full length album titled Geomancer (it was released just last Friday, the 24th of August), it’s a double pleasure since I don’t just get to introduce you to a band but an excellent one at that. They deliver the kind of emotional doom/stoner/psychedelic that we’ve come to expect in 2018, replete with great riffs, moving vocals from two complementary vocalists, and an overall dedication to momentum that lies at the core of what makes this kind of music work.

Stepping Stone: Seether // Disclaimer II

I’ve talked before about some of the music that got me where I am today, with the likes of Linkin Park and Ministry. At an earlier time than my forays into Ministry and industrial music, however, there were a certain key groups that I immediately latched onto, mostly because my friend let me rip his CDs onto my crappy little Sandisk MP3 player. I’m talking bands like Linkin Park, but, also, a not-so little group from South Africa called Seether and their sophomore album Disclaimer II.

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 6/3/16

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.net through your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

Stepping Stone: Ministry – Psalm 69

Today, I’m going to explore an album that was a huge influence on me in high school that I haven’t listened to in some time: Ministry’s Psalm 69, released in 1992 on the Sire/Warner Bros label, and considered not only one of the best Ministry albums, but also one of the most essential industrial metal albums ever.

Starter Kit: Max Cavalera

I’ve previously expressed my opinions, however brief, about Max Cavalera: ex-Sepultura singer, groove metal pioneer and overall Brazilian badass. While I haven’t been the biggest fan of Cavalera’s recent output of music, I nonetheless owe a great debt to this man, as without him I probably wouldn’t be into metal…