The Afterimage – Eve

We all know bands that have difficult roads to their first full-length albums. Sometimes the journey is so difficult that you only see a smattering of singles and EPs materialize. There can be a long period of silence before you see the saddening, “It’s been a great run” social media…

TesseracT – Sonder

The first three albums of a band’s career all have their own thematic tropes. The debut is often seen as the most primal, the fuel that often catapults sensational bands into fame. The sophomore release is the one where the true wheat is separated from the chaff; bands choose to…

The Sleeper – Apparatus

After a quiet 5 years, German progressive metal outfit The Sleeper have finally provided a follow-up to their debut 2013 album, Aurora. The band’s newest effort is a 6 track EP titled Apparatus, and it marks a significant change in the project’s sound. Aurora felt like a release that was…

Veil of Maya – False Idol

In 2015, metalcore pioneers Veil of Maya released their fifth album Matriarch. It was their first record with clean vocals on it, courtesy of new vocalist Lukas Magyar. Depending on who you ask, the injection of this new blood either reinvigorated the group, poisoned them, or worse, made them sound like a Periphery clone. Whether…

Loincloth – Psalm of the Morbid Whore

Loincloth are an interesting group, one that meshes together various elements from realms of metal but keeps a very distinct sound of sludgy, crushing, and almost atonal instrumental metal. Their records sit nice and snuggly on their Southern Lord label, baring resemblance to the general dark ambiance and heavy production that bring together other artists in this territory. Not only do they have their sound up to scratch, but they even get quite progressive within their sound, employing left-field rhythms and grooves that are extremely math-core inspired and really grab you and keep you engaged. This band have so much going for them, and they truly showcase what it means to do a lot with a little. Not to mention I absolutely love that I can put an image to this music of three shirtless, bearded guys in a claustrophobic room, jamming intensely while getting lost in the power of the riff. But yet, while this record is a fun experience at first, there’s some qualities to it that need some workshopping because this release wears pretty thin, pretty fast.

Hey! Listen To Sea In The Sky!

Do you like exclusively clean vocals? Do you like progressive rock with a bit of a groovy, even djent-y edge to it? Will you listen to anything that comes out of the San Francisco Bay Area music scene? Well then, have I got the band for you! They’re called Sea in the Sky and though they liken themselves to Periphery, CHON and Polyphia, I hear flashes of swancore bands like Dance Gavin Dance, Stolas and Hail the Sun. They’re releasing a new album on September 29th called Everything All at Once, but luckily we can listen to two singles from it right this very moment!

The Celtic Connection – Serenity Came Calling Debut “Tenebris” Music Video

We’re a wee country, Scotland. We like to think we’re world beaters at anything we try our hand at. Doesn’t matter whether it’s football, politics or metal, it’s not in our people’s nature to half ass anything. Last week we got to hear brand new music from one of the country’s more elusive acts and today, we give you the brand new, still warm to the touch it’s that hot off the press music video from Serenity Came Calling. Newbies should head over the jump for crushing yet silky tones a la Northlane and bruising metalcore a la Wage War. No half measures.

Djent Was A Genre Full Of Great Debuts And Little Else

Djent had an explosive entrance into the world of heavy music, around the start of the decade. It was a truly exciting occurrence, with first-wave acts like Periphery, Animals As Leaders and Cloudkicker filtering the technically-driven progressive sound of acts like Meshuggah, Sikth, and those of the budding “Sumeriancore” movement, into something  altogether more accessible, while still retaining much of their forebears’ technical and progressive edge. Yet, like most new sub-genres, djent quickly devolved into pastiche and gave way to over saturation—perhaps a little bit quicker than most. Djent, it seems, has had a propperly ballistic trajectory, and—in 2017—as its momentum trails off, it’s hard to get excited about this once-promising phenomenon.