Aegaeon – Age

Influence has led to both amazingly original and incredibly derivative works of art. As fantastic as innovation can be, sometimes an idea can be tweaked and nary a thing has to be changed to make it something that stands on its own in a unique and interesting way. In 2013 Aegaeon…

Krosis – Solem Vatem

“Come for the food, stay for the atmosphere” is the phrase that comes to mind when contemplating Salem Vatem, the 2nd full length album from Krosis, the Raleigh, NC based progressive deathcore band. The food is the music served to us, filling our mental plate with meaty breakdowns while also providing a variety of…

Entheos – Dark Future

Progressive death metal outfit Entheos have had a productive three years, to say the least. 2015 saw their formation, shortly followed by the release of their debut EP Primal. 2016 saw the departure of founding guitarist Frank Costa and the introduction of their new guitarist, Malcolm Pugh. Frank had already recorded all of the rhythm guitars for the bands first full length album, so Malcolm came in and knocked out the lead guitars so that The Infinite Nothing could be unleashed upon the world. Only two months after the album’s release, the band announced the departure of Malcolm Pugh and in the same breath announced that former Scale the Summit guitarist Travis LeVrier would be taking his place in the band permanently. Now, in the latter half of 2017 we have received their second album, Dark Future, recorded in the early part of this year.

Winds of Plague – Blood Of My Enemy

It’s easy to see why Winds of Plague are the butt of jokes in “internet metal circles”. As they rose to popularity during the most oversaturated era of deathcore, their imagery and lyrical content was mostly emblematic of all the tropes of the genre. Their most recognizable songs were aggressively simplistic thematically and musically. This reception is almost a shame, because Winds of Plague have always had a brilliant band hidden somewhere in that well of unrealized potential. The entirety of The Great Stone War, which was a progressive deathcore showcase, and tracks like “Angels of Debauchery” from their debut showcased the band’s more creative and clever aspects, but it’s also undeniable that the band brought this upon themselves with tracks like “Reloaded”. Regardless, there’s been a small contingent of fans wishing for a return to the more nuanced and epic sound that they often hinted at. After 4 years and a nearly-entirely-new lineup, the band returns with Blood of My Enemy, which doesn’t fully satisfy that craving, but is a massive step in the right direction for the band.

Hey! Listen to End!

The word “savage” gets thrown around in conversations about extreme music a lot. Honestly, too much. Way too much. So much in fact that the word itself has begun to lose any and all meaning. You know the argument: If everything is savage, nothing is. Because pulling out the thesaurus…

Rotten to the Core – devthbed, Justice for the Damned & Vein

We’re at a point where a hot shit, flavour of the month band can become old hat moments after they are touted as the next big thing. It’s so easy to lose track of who’s who, what’s hot and not and generally what the hell is happening in music and it’s always gonna be impossible to hear everything good out there. That’s where Heavy Blog, and others like us, come in. We have our core features focusing on specific genres—what’s up Grind My Gears fans?!—but today I’m lumping together bands who’s only similarity is their shared suffix. They’re all “core” in some form or another. To make things more digestible, I’ve even added a strapline for each, covering their sound in one fantastically humorous sentence. Please, enjoy and rock responsibly.

Thy Art Is Murder – Dear Desolation

Only three albums into their career, the angry Aussies in Thy Art is Murder are a household name not only in deathcore, but extreme metal as a whole. The fourth album can be a tough place to be in for an established band, especially if your sophomore and junior releases are as good as Hate and Holy War. Though well-established and on the path to even more exposure and success, the band are still not immune to the possibility of dropping something that may not completely meet the expectations of their fans all over the globe and tainting their reputation of quality releases. Fortunately for those anticipating their senior album Dear Desolation, there is no disappointment to worry about. With this album, the band have dug their heels deeper into the dirt of what they do best and risen to the occasion by not only meeting the standards of previous albums but also setting new ones.