On The Virtue of Un-authenticity or The Sun of Badakhshan

This is certainly an “off brand” post for Heavy Blog to be running but, if you’ve been following the blog for a good measure of time, you should know that we love music in all its forms. One of the greatest joys these brings us is connecting with people from all over the world in their love of music, whatever genre or style they might be playing. Thus, we get sent a lot of stuff, from a lot of backgrounds, geo-locations and styles. Recently, one of our contacts from Australia, Lachlan R Dale (you know him as Art of Catharsis, one of the best and most eclectic underground labels in Australia and, indeed, the world, and bands like Hashshashin and Serious Beak) got in touch with us with something special, something of a pedigree unlike anything else we’ve run on the blog.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE – The Cartographer Swing In To “Vultures” Music Video

I love hearing the influence of bands I already love in new music. Maybe The Cartographer weren’t necessarily thinking of Fear Factory when they wrote “Vultures”, but that’s kind of what I’m getting. Taken from their Human Error EP released last year, we’ve got the video premiere for this groovy beast of a track. With consumer tastes in “proper” metal changing so rapidly, it’s nice to have a band to remind people that certain sounds are always satisfying. It’s groovy and it’s heavy and it will damn well make you bang your head.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE – Dark Habits Even Bring The Kitchen Sink In “Porcelain Dreams” Video

Fans of my entries to the Grind My Gears franchise (it’s a franchise now; deal with it) will recognise the name Dark Habits and should be instantly brought back to memories of harsh, devastating bursts of hyper violence and crust. The best kind of noise around. They’ve barely scratched the surface of the Earth with their very recently released debut but look set to tunnel right through the crust of the planet itself. It’s only fitting that Heavy Blog debuts the brand new video from these Glaswegian d-beat bastards because it’s heavy, it’s grim and it’s sweaty as fuck; I speak for myself when I admit that I’m definitely a great example of the latter.

VIDEO PREMIERE: Year of the Cobra – “Temple of Apollo”

Since Year of the Cobra’s 2015 inception, Amy and Jon Barrysmith have proven that you don’t need a huge band to create a huge sound. Producing massive, infectious heavy riffage and a sound mightier than a duo should rightfully lay claim to this pairing pummel audiences the world over. You’d be forgiven for drawing the easy straight-line comparison to Jucifer considering the similar pieces parts but you’d be doing yourself a woeful injustice to both bands.

PREMIERE: Uneven Structure Bare “Crystal Teeth” In New Video

It’s been nearly six years since we were absolutely floored by Uneven Structure’s debut album Februus. It was a perfect storm of ambition, atmosphere, and emotional/conceptual depth that made it tower above the array of djent records that dropped in the early 2010’s. Depending on who you ask, it may be the best record that has ever come out of that scene.

The follow up La Partition is no slouch, either.

PREMIERE: Jump Into the Deep End With Pray For Sound’s “Everywhere, Everywhere” Video

It’s been a while since we mentioned Boston instrumental post-rock group Pray For Sound here. Originally we told you to listen to their 2014 album Dreamer, which Eden complimented for its open, cinematic sounds calling to mind the likes of sleepmakeswaves, Explosions in the Sky, and plenty more. True to form, after telling you all to listen to that album over half a year after its release, we somehow managed to let these guys slip through our fingers again as they released their truly excellent follow-up Everything Is Beautiful last fall. Don’t ask us how it happened because we don’t have a good answer other than us being fools. Certainly don’t think it has anything to do with the quality of the album because Everything Is Beautiful is undoubtedly the most fully-realized and expansive record Pray For Sound have put out. It’s sweeping, cinematic post-rock at its finest that knows how and when to hit heavy and add plenty of interesting knots throughout while maintaining its general feel of open, pastoral beauty.