Gorod – Aethra

On the surface, the concept of ever actively reducing complexity seems fairly antithetical to entire purpose of technical death metal. Considering that this is a genre that prides itself on taking an already extreme form of music and heaping layers of further intricacy on top, why would one ever want…

Aborted – TerrorVision

Branding is a weird concept when it comes to death metal. How does a band ensure their sound is instantly recognisable in a world full of Soundalikes, all trying to blast faster, groove harder, and shred more than the rest? Fuck knows. If you really need the answer to that…

Riverside – Wasteland

Warsaw’s Riverside return with their seventh studio album in Wasteland. Whereas 2015’s Love, Fear and the Time Machine sought to connect with sounds of progressive giants Ayreon and Opeth (who themselves are heavily influenced by the progressive music of the ’80s), Wasteland embraces something in between the progressive and psychedelic…

The Arusha Accord – Juracan

People often make the mistake of assuming that legacy is a matter of size, that the narratives which are hard to contend with deriving their power from mass, from sheer presence of the past. To be fair, it’s not an entirely erroneous assumption; bands which contend with a massive legacy,…

Coheed and Cambria – The Unheavenly Creatures

When Coheed and Cambria dropped their eighth album The Color Before The Sun in 2015, they made some pretty shocking waves among their incredibly rabid fanbase by giving their conceptual Amory Wars universe a hiatus. Frontman and primary songwriter Claudio Sanchez instead brought to the table some deeply personal tracks about love, his family, and his take on being at the helm of such a longstanding rock establishment without the pretense of hiding his thoughts and feelings behind characters and plot beats. This experiment went well enough; the record had some of the band’s most heartfelt material and provided more than a few Coheed classics, but the desire for more science fiction lore and progressive rock cheese was felt by basically everyone.