Death and the Penguin – Anomie

In 2018, the following sentence is a confession: I still really like brit-rock. Don’t get me wrong, the genre deserved everything it got; under the guise of alternative music and a rebel spirit, it connived with corporate interests to create some of the most plastic and regurgitated music ever made, hiding it all under the selfsame guise of edgy counter culture. But I was confessing; I still really like it. I like the morose style of vocals, I like the straight-forward guitar music, and I like the thin veneer of British depression and snark which coats it. And I love it when all of those elements are mixed with modern music, especially progressive rock. That’s a pretty specific formula but, luckily for me, Death and the Penguin have been working at it for a while now.

Talons – We All Know

For those willing to rummage through the fecund fields of modern post-rock, there’s plenty to appreciate in this new life, springing to action for a decade now. A good example is Talons, whose experimental take on the genre and unique timbre makes a resplendent return and rebirth on their latest album, We All Know. The first half of the album is a more condensed version of that sound, leaning heavily on noise rock and other, chunkier genres for its punch and impact. Thus, tracks like “On Levels” and “Movements on Seven”, channel a more urgent, industrial sound that reminds us at times of Stateless by way of early Long Distance Calling, a kind of urgent post-rock that’s more abrasive and compact for that urgency, even when it builds up and releases slowly.

Plini Is Coming Back To Remind Us How Nu-Prog Is Done With “Sunhead” EP

Fellow denizens of the Metalosphere (shut up, it’s a thing now), rejoice! For, at long last, the Australian voice of one Plini has returned to grace our ears. In the sea of mediocrity that nu-prog has quickly become (and, perhaps, always was for the most part), Plini’s voice has been an essential reason to even bother with the genre. From the first of his EPs and down to the genius of his previous release, Handmade Cities, Plini’s approach to nu-prog has been more interesting and accomplished than almost all of his peers. So, when the man announced his upcoming EP, Sunhead, I was thrilled. The first single from it (released as a standalone to begin with but later included in the album itself) was good but I knew that more was coming. And, lo and behold, we now have that “more” in the form of “Kind”.

Hey! Listen to DON PIE PIE!

It’s been a veritable hot minute since we’ve told you to go read Fecking Bahamas. Go read it! Seriously, if you like the style of stuff that we do here at Heavy Blog but wish we covered math-rock and lots of it, this is the blog for you. Case in point,…

The Progress Melter – Steel Panther and the Extent of “Comedy”

This should go without saying, but women have always had the ability to excel at playing guitar, and they often have. The rock and metal scene specifically has benefited from the contributions of players like Chelsea Wolfe, Liz Buckingham (Electric Wizard), Simone Dow (Voyager), Nancy Wilson (Heart), Lori Von Linstruth (Ayreon), Sarah Longfield, Laura…

aAnd? – .​.​.​wWoof?

Comedy and metal have always made for slightly awkward bedfellows. When you consider just how fertile the ground is for humour in metal, it is slightly surprising that there isn’t more of it about. In the main, even when daubing oneself in elaborate facepaint and writing high velocity peons to…

Hey! Listen to Ghostbound!

I love that I’ve written so much about avant-garde music lately that I don’t have to once again start with an intro about how weird of a genre it is. The Lychgate review I recently wrote is a pretty good summary of how I feel about the moniker. Actually, referring to that review is a statement about avant-garde in and of itself since there’s little in common between that album and the band we have in mind today, Ghostbound. The first has more black metal on it and a lot more abrasiveness, whereas Ghostbound’s All is Phantom draws more on the epic nature of progressive rock and the dramatic thrill of bands like Marillion. But it also layers those ideas on top of frequent blast beats, prominent strings, thick guitars and much more that comes from metal and its approach to the avant-garde. In short, it’s a wild ride of an album which leaves us beggared for an exact definition.

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Let’s Take a Trip to Maeth’s “Whaling Village”

Maeth’s Shrouded Mountain, released in 2016, was an excellent addition to the progressive doom milieu. It wove drippy guitars, overladen with distortion and overdrive, amazing flute segments and ambitious track and album structures into one bewildering whole. This is why it is my very distinct pleasure to premiere their next album today. It goes by the name of Whaling Village and is comprised of three incredible tracks which further cement Maeth as one of the more important voices in this mini-scene of progressive doom metal. This release doubles down on their sound, handing us a more refined and yet, somehow heavier and more oppressive, version of the Maeth sound. It is contradiction all but also harmonious and melodic in heart wrenching ways.