Heavy Buys: Immolation – Here In After [2017 Remastered Reissue // Blood Red]

For being as venerable and insanely talented as they are, I feel as though Immolation gets the shit-end of the death metal history stick. They have their following and they're not exactly a band that's languished in obscurity or would be considered anything near a "forgotten classic," but they really deserve a lot more attention and respect than they get. Calling their discography gem-studded doesn't do them justice; their almost 30-year history as a band has been almost entirely gems. Seriously, what other classic early-90's death metal band is still putting out new albums and, more importantly, evolving their sound with pretty much no breaks? That's impressive as fuck no matter how you slice it!

A Guide to Record Store Day’s Most Notable Releases

Record Store Day is less than a month away, and vinyl fanatics like myself have been stoking our anticipation with the massive list of special releases being featured this year. Of course, it truly is a massive list, and since lines at record stores will almost certainly be even bigger, it'll behoove all of us to have a game plan prior to fluffing our sleeping bags to camp out at the door. That's why I decided to sit down - with input from Eden - and list what we believe to be the essential release from this year's RSD; records that truly capture the essence of that "special release" vibe that the pseudo-holiday has built its reputation upon. This won't be a comprehensive list by any means, and I encourage everyone to comment with the releases that you're most looking forward to snagging next month. That being said, head past the jump to see the vinyl nerd in me gush about what RSD 2016 has to offer.
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DNF – Hurt

DNF, formerly known as Duke Nukem Forever, were a typical hardcore outfit with powerviolence tendencies jutting out here and there. For those not in the know, powerviolence is a subgenre of hardcore that is a bit faster, but also a lot slower. Bands like Black Flag were a major influence as they switched from early hardcore to more sludgy tunes. Bands like Infest, Spazz, and Charles Bronson started popping up around the country that went from straight up hardcore to straight up sludge.