I Feel It Coming – How Streaming is Changing Music Consumption

Over the past couple years, we've published two massive articles about the current state and impending trends of music consumption—my deep dive on the tough realities of streaming platforms and Nick's bullshit-free synopsis of Nielsen's 2016 music industry report. While both of these pieces had minimal references to metal, the research and analysis we presented outlines some staggering changes to the entirety of music, changes that continue to expand and show no sign of slowing. And though it's been just over a year since I channeled my B.A. thesis on streaming for my deep dive, Billboard published a story that compelled me to revisit the topic and write down my thoughts as soon as possible. The facts of the story are relatively simple—because Billboard now incorporates track streams into the sales figures they consider, The Weeknd's Starboy remained at #1 on the Top 200 for this week because it technically "sold" more albums than The XX's I See You, landing the British indie pop trio at #2 on the list despite selling more actual albums. This story stopped me in my tracks, as it poses an equally intriguing and worrisome question - are streams and purchases comparable, and what are the implications if Billboard thinks they are?