Monobody – Raytracing

One of the most consistently difficult and frustrating things about covering music that falls into the buckets of math rock, fusion, prog, and more is that a central and foundational tenet of that music - complexity - also ends up being the very thing that is the music's undoing. Fans can (and do) constantly obsess over how many unusual time signatures a song packs in as a proportional measure of how great that music is, but so often in the pursuit of the most head-spinning riffs, polyrhythmic grooves, and impenetrable song forms, what most frequently is lost is the music itself and whether it's actually worth listening to. There's nothing wrong with complexity and complicated music, but if there isn't an adequate payoff for the time and patience required to "understand" it then what exactly are we doing here?

Jazz Club // COAST – COAST

"Modern" has always been one of my least favorite genre prefixes. With the myriad of stylistic tags at artists' disposal, it seems like an odd choice to fixate on the recency of a piece of music as a means of describing its sound. As is demonstrated by any number of revivalist movements operating in the current music landscape, "modern" music isn't always a guarantee of fresh, forward-thinking ideas, and in my experience, the tag is often used to posture standard genre fare delivered with a newer sheen as something new and revelatory. Of course, there's an exception to every rule, and when it comes to this particular pet peeve of mine, I've never been happier to have a band prove me wrong as wrong as COAST do with their phenomenal self-titled debut. Every aspect of COAST embodies what "modern" jazz should represent. Over the course of the album's six brilliant tracks, the quartet executes jazz's greatest traits with precision and agility. In short, COAST offers everything jazz fans love about the genre, except this time, it's simply performed at a better, higher level.