Hey! Listen to The Grey!

As a general rule, a metal band that takes the decision to remain instrumental is more likely to be a proggy or mathy affair. When listening to them, it’s more common to find oneself swaying to twinkly explorations or twitching to movable-feast time signatures than outright headbanging. But rules are meant…

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Talons – We All Know

For those willing to rummage through the fecund fields of modern post-rock, there’s plenty to appreciate in this new life, springing to action for a decade now. A good example is Talons, whose experimental take on the genre and unique timbre makes a resplendent return and rebirth on their latest album, We All Know. The first half of the album is a more condensed version of that sound, leaning heavily on noise rock and other, chunkier genres for its punch and impact. Thus, tracks like “On Levels” and “Movements on Seven”, channel a more urgent, industrial sound that reminds us at times of Stateless by way of early Long Distance Calling, a kind of urgent post-rock that’s more abrasive and compact for that urgency, even when it builds up and releases slowly.

Release Day Roundup – 2/2/18

Each month, we always seem to come to the same conclusion when it comes to our Editors’ Picks column: Friday release days open the floodgates and unleash a seemingly endless stream of quality new music. But while some of our Editors and Contributors sit down gleefully each week to dive into this newly stocked treasure trove, others find themselves drawing a blank at the end of the month due to the breakneck pace needed to keep up to date with what’s been released. Which brings us to this Heavy Blog PSA: a weekly roundup of new albums which pares down the week’s releases to only our highest recommendations. Here you’ll find full album/single streams, pre-order links and, most importantly, a collection of albums that could very well earn a spot on your year-end list. Enjoy!

Long Distance Calling – Boundless

When comes the time for experimentation to cease? Should some bands stop mutating their sound at some point and settle in? And if the answer is “yes” to either of these questions, how can they know when it comes? These questions probably don’t have an answer and all we can do is try and look at examples of different choices and timings and glean something from the tale. Long Distance Calling is a fantastic, if somewhat beguiling, example. Through their career, they’ve been known from not being afraid of changing things up. Their latest release, Trips, was an immense departure from their established sound, with influences from brit-rock and pop coming in with the addition of Petter Carlsen on vocals. But now, Carlsen has departed and it seems as if Long Distance Calling, perhaps borne aloft by their insatiable desire for new, have rather gone backwards.

What Heavy Blog Is Really Listening To – 4/22/16

For those who missed our last installment, We post biweekly updates covering what the staff at Heavy Blog have been spinning. Given the amount of time we spend on the site telling you about music that does not fall neatly into the confines of conventional “metal,” it should come as no surprise that many of us on staff have pretty eclectic tastes that range far outside of metal and heavy things. We can’t post about all of them at length here, but we can at least let you know what we’re actually listening to. For those that would like to participate as well (and please do) can drop a 3X3 in the comments, which can be made with tapmusic.net through your last.fm account, or create it manually with topsters.net. Also, consider these posts open threads to talk about pretty much anything music-related. We love hearing all of your thoughts on this stuff and love being able to nerd out along with all of you.

Long Distance Calling – TRIPS

Allow me a personal note for a minute; I did not expect to like this album as much as I did. Long Distance Calling were always one of those bands that I almost liked but did not quite manage to fully embrace. Their sound seemed obvious to me and the last album, Nighthawk, did nothing much to assuage that. Their definition as post rock always seemed erroneous to me, my mind wanting to catalog them as simply another progressive, instrumental band. Sure, they had some good track on Avoid the Light, “The Nearing Grave” with Jonas Renske (Katatonia) was my favorite, but nothing was really awe inspiring. However, it would be a good idea to keep the above quote in mind before pressing play on their latest album. While it should be obvious by now that this band has been undergoing changes for some time, what with the addition of a vocalist to their last album, the extent of their transformation is perhaps not readily apparent from the cover of TRIPS. This album is an intriguing experiment in what happens when you take your core sound and throw it out the window, instead focusing on the dynamics and interactions that existed beneath it.