Release Day Roundup – 9/13/19

Editor’s Note: I’m glad to welcome longtime reader Remi VL as a regular guest contributor to our Release Day Roundup posts! He submitted several of the albums listed below. Join his Facebook group for more recommendations. -Scott Murphy Each month, we always seem to come to the same conclusion when…

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The Progress Melter – Steel Panther and the Extent of “Comedy”

This should go without saying, but women have always had the ability to excel at playing guitar, and they often have. The rock and metal scene specifically has benefited from the contributions of players like Chelsea Wolfe, Liz Buckingham (Electric Wizard), Simone Dow (Voyager), Nancy Wilson (Heart), Lori Von Linstruth (Ayreon), Sarah Longfield, Laura…

Heavy Blog Guest List – Dreadnought’s Top 10 Albums of 2017

Editor’s note: Yes, it’s that time of the year again! While our own Album of the Year list is coming down the line, we have a ton of end of year content for you. Over the next two weeks, we’ll be exploring 2017 in various of ways: through curated summaries for specific genres, editorials on specific phenomena we found interesting and, of course, guest lists! This time around, we have one of the most exciting bands currently in operation: Dreadnought! Hailing from the by-now vaunted scene from Denver, Dreadnought traffic in the areas around doom metal, introducing influences from black metal, folk rock and progressive rock. Their albums are true monoliths of complexity and melody, with this year’s A Wake in Sacred Waves denoting somewhat of a high water mark for any bands wishing to work in the space of experimental doom. Their list is as diverse as you would expect; from the jazz styling of none other than the legendary Thundercat, through the blackened wastes of Ruins of Beverast and all the way back to the off-kilter musings of Bjork, their list draws from as many directions as their music does.

So, without wasting any more of your time, here is Dreadnought’s Top 10 albums for 2017!

Glaare – To Deaf and Day

If depression had an official soundtrack, there’s no question it’d be exclusively comprised of songs from post-punk’s family tree. The genre’s swirl of reverb, haunting bass lines and drab, lifeless vocals capture the essence of endlessly staring out the window of a dimly lit room on a rainy day, every…