EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Bearers Drop Some Scottish Metalcore Heat With “Confessions”

It’s not all high-cholesterol, heart disease, and football violence in Scotland. Sometimes kids grow up playing music instead of smashing each other in the face with bricks and bottles. Some of those kids end up playing in orange marching bands but we don’t talk about them. Bearers obviously grew up playing the right kind of tunes, and today we’re giving you a first listen to the latest single from their debut LP, Inhumation. Fans of techy metalcore and drop-tuned breakdowns rejoice, as “Confessions” has more than enough riffs to drown out the flutes and drums on the streets. Thank fuck.

Cutting through the airwaves in a similar vein to neighbours From Sorrow To Serenity, Bearers lay down a kind of polished metalcore that hits fast and hard, only stopping to let a chorus swell up now and again. “Confessions” continues the band’s rise towards mosh-pit majesty, holding a hefty intro and a cataclysmic final breakdown in its clutches. The verses are groovier, dipping and diving around a tasty slap bass that punches nice and clear through the low-end and atmospheric synths. The tempo shift around the halfway point might come as a bit of a surprise, but the descent back into crunching groove is seamless. For a track under four minutes long, there are an arse load of transitions, but they all work.

A fresh-faced act with members from several Scots acts, Bearers enlist the vocal services of Lotus Eater vocalist Jamie Mclees on this track – his bitter vocals adding another level to the professional punch of the metalcore present. All in their very early 20s, the band have taken big steps towards notoriety around the country and it shouldn’t be long before UK venues are laid waste to the shuddering riffs and spills found on Inhumation. The record is out on September 13th, giving you plenty of time to get ready for a particularly lethal dose of Silent Planet-esque venom. Volatile stuff, with a nice clinical edge to it. Get your pre-order here.

 

 

 

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The longer the note, the more dread