EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Revel in The Ghost Next Door’s “A Feast for the Sixth Sense”

Good morning and welcome once again to the wave of progressive stoner metal which has been washing over us for several years now. This time, we are proud to premiere The Ghost Next Door’s A Feast for the Sixth Sense, a politically charged exploration of groove, riffs, and the powers they hold. The album’s centerpiece is probably the…

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Heavy Rewind – Psychotic Waltz’s A Social Grace

This Californian band’s first iteration lasted a decade, until 1997 (they are now reunited and working on new music, who’s quality is yet to be tested). During that decade they released four albums, with a clear difference between the first two and the latter two. Those two first album, and the debut especially, are masterclasses in progressive metal and represent to this day some of the best actualization of why progressive metal is great. They are technical but furiously aggressive, drawing from the pools of progressive rock and thrash equally. The result is two fantastically deep albums with the first being a timeless classic which has sadly gone forgotten.

Heavy Rewind – Entropia

Some albums fracture: their own fame is somehow forgotten among listeners and even experts but their legacy can be found in countless acts that come after them. Whether it’s their approach to their specific genre, actual sounds and moments from the album or a method of production, the basis elements of what made up the album get recycled, reused, resurrected. This can create an interesting disparity between how important the album is and how much people know it or even still play it, so long after it came out. Entropia is one of those albums. Not only did it launch one of the longest careers in progressive metal, namely that of Pain of Salvation, it also broke numerous limits and forged a vision of what progressive metal could be, way back when in 1997.