In Vain – Currents

The five years that have passed since the release of Ænigma (2013) likely mean that the window of opportunity for In Vain and their phenomenal third outing to become anything more than curious blips on the progressive metal radar. Had the band come back in full force following that most…

The Sleeper – Apparatus

After a quiet 5 years, German progressive metal outfit The Sleeper have finally provided a follow-up to their debut 2013 album, Aurora. The band’s newest effort is a 6 track EP titled Apparatus, and it marks a significant change in the project’s sound. Aurora felt like a release that was…

Entheos – Dark Future

Progressive death metal outfit Entheos have had a productive three years, to say the least. 2015 saw their formation, shortly followed by the release of their debut EP Primal. 2016 saw the departure of founding guitarist Frank Costa and the introduction of their new guitarist, Malcolm Pugh. Frank had already recorded all of the rhythm guitars for the bands first full length album, so Malcolm came in and knocked out the lead guitars so that The Infinite Nothing could be unleashed upon the world. Only two months after the album’s release, the band announced the departure of Malcolm Pugh and in the same breath announced that former Scale the Summit guitarist Travis LeVrier would be taking his place in the band permanently. Now, in the latter half of 2017 we have received their second album, Dark Future, recorded in the early part of this year.

Veil of Maya – False Idol

In 2015, metalcore pioneers Veil of Maya released their fifth album Matriarch. It was their first record with clean vocals on it, courtesy of new vocalist Lukas Magyar. Depending on who you ask, the injection of this new blood either reinvigorated the group, poisoned them, or worse, made them sound like a Periphery clone. Whether…

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Paper Hero “Think Deep” In First Music Video

Chicago progressive quintet Paper Hero released their Colorless Aquarium EP in July of 2016. Filled with slick riffs courtesy of guitarists Maru Martinez and Brycen Doby, rhythmic drum and bass with Tristan Zemtseff and Austin Ramsey (respectively), and soaring vocal melodies and metalcore-reminiscent growls from vocalist Giovanni Franceschi (with a…

Loincloth – Psalm of the Morbid Whore

Loincloth are an interesting group, one that meshes together various elements from realms of metal but keeps a very distinct sound of sludgy, crushing, and almost atonal instrumental metal. Their records sit nice and snuggly on their Southern Lord label, baring resemblance to the general dark ambiance and heavy production that bring together other artists in this territory. Not only do they have their sound up to scratch, but they even get quite progressive within their sound, employing left-field rhythms and grooves that are extremely math-core inspired and really grab you and keep you engaged. This band have so much going for them, and they truly showcase what it means to do a lot with a little. Not to mention I absolutely love that I can put an image to this music of three shirtless, bearded guys in a claustrophobic room, jamming intensely while getting lost in the power of the riff. But yet, while this record is a fun experience at first, there’s some qualities to it that need some workshopping because this release wears pretty thin, pretty fast.

Vattnet – Vattnet

Starting over is not the easiest thing in the world, but it does have its benefits. There is freedom in going back to the point of inception because there are no preconceived notions of what is to come. Even if people remember what came before, that was the past and this is the future, which stops for no one. When Vattnet, previously known to us as the post-black metal band Vattnet Viskar, lost one of their two founding members, they saw an opportunity to go back to the beginning and build from the ground up. Cleaving their band name in half, they looked toward the future and decided to make a self-titled album album that, in the words of guitarist Chris Alfieri, “we could listen to forever, even if no one else liked it.”