Post Rock Post – Alters

Alright folks, hold on to your seats because this one is going to get wild. Allow me to introduce you to Alters, an extremely interesting band from Poland. Nominally, their thing is a blend of progressive rock and post rock. The progressive parts take a very distinct influence from one Steven Wilson, with the opening tracks to their most recent album, Dawn, sounding a lot like Porcupine Tree. “Hypnagogia” and, even more so, the self-titled track which open the album have all the unique identifiers you’d associate with this style of progressive rock. The drums are loud, the vocalist seems aloof and depressed, the guitars are influenced by classic progressive rock but with an exceedingly modern sound. So far, so good; things are pleasant and well made, if not totally original or mind-blowing.

The third track, “Klechdawa”, starts in the same manner. Indeed, it goes on in that manner until its mid-point. But then, there’s a break and everything changes.

Malady – Toinen Toista

At the beginning of this year (fuck, it’s almost April), we told you about Malady, a treasure trove of progressive rock hailing from the criminally overlooked Finnish music scene. Their first, self titled release, was a somber take on the progressive rock formula, mostly emphasizing the feeling of loss and wanderlust that…

Soldat Hans – Es Taut

When browsing through a large amount of music, as presented by our inbox or one of the many online music sources out there, it’s easy to develop fatigue. You give each track some time but, governed by the inexorable power of Sturgeon’s Law, most of what you hear is uninspired…

Exclusivo ad absurdum: Stream Instrumental (Adj.)’s New EP

Australia’s musical scene seems to know no bounds, and, thanks to the talents and efforts of people like Lachlan of Art as Catharsis, they are spread to the outside world. Case in point: I have the pleasure of introducing you to the entirety of Reductio ad absurdum, the upcoming EP from Sydney trio Instrumental (Adj.). The three have made quite a few waves on the Internet when they released their surprising and fresh debut A Series of Disagreements. It was short, but it overflowed with clever musical ideas and precise execution. It was jazzy, progressive, aggressive, mathematical, and, most of all, I couldn’t get enough of listening to it.

Between the Buried and Me – Automata I

As they approach 20 years of activity, Between the Buried and Me have surely attained the status of legacy act in the realm of progressive metal with a weight to their name comparable to that of Opeth and Dream Theater; they’re world-class headliners and have crafted some of the greatest records to ever come out of the genre, and they arguably had a hand of influence in the influx of progressive metalcore acts that emerged in the mid-to-late 2000’s. With that prolific status comes its drawbacks, however; much like Opeth and Dream Theater, later-era works are the topic of much debate and are subject to higher scrutiny, and being guilty of creating an album that is just okay is damning.

Love Letter – Playing Prog Rock Fucking Loud

You know the part: the drums, thick and resonating, pick up pace, the bass licks in anticipation of the crescendo and all of a sudden the synths are there, Hammond goodness washing over the soaring guitar parts as the vocals explode into a high note. This structure of “ensemble buildup”, where the entire band join forces to form the climax of a track, is a staple of many genres but progressive rock has always been the best at it. King Crimson’s “Starless”, Yes’s “Heart of the Sunrise”, Wishbone Ash’s “Warrior” (containing one of the world’s most famous and most forgotten solos), Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon and many, many other tracks and albums come to mind. Even younger bands operating today and paying homage to the style (like Malady, Wobbler, Witchcraft and more) adopt the prominence of the climax and full band collaboration.

Hey! Listen to Weedpecker!

It is our tendency to wear things out, especially music, that, in part, gives our community so much life. For example, I’ve listened to Elder so many times since Reflections From a Floating World came out that I need a break. I’m driven then to search for the same kind of sound but done a bit differently, someone that isn’t Elder but that can scratch that same itch. A high bar indeed! Luckily, my network reaches far and I’m sent albums all of the time, one of which (all the way from Poland) was Weedpecker’s III, a wonderful and expansive exploration of 70’s influenced stoner rock that lives in the same spaces as Elder. Now I’m here to repay the favor and tell you to listen to it; see you below for more!