Vexes – Ancient Geometry

In what circumstances does a new band’s direct unabashed influence from a well known active band make those newcomers derivative, redundant, and irrelevant? International prog supergroup Soen, for instance, gets a pass at their obvious take on Tool because of Tool’s inactivity over the last decade; at this point, it’s…

The Anatomy Of: Vexes

Surely by now you’ve all heard some of the buzz surrounding the up-and-coming hard rock / post-hardcore group Vexes. Featuring former members of A Life Once Lost, Vessl, Fury of Five, and Downstage, the act are gearing up to release their debut album Ancient Geometry this week, and if you’re a fan…

The Anatomy Of: Zaius

When I got my hands on Zaius’s new album for the first time, I was immediately interested in what makes such a band tick. They seemed firmly rooted in the emerging Chicago post metal/rock scene but also of their own type, their music infused in something unique. I jumped on…

Vattnet – Vattnet

Starting over is not the easiest thing in the world, but it does have its benefits. There is freedom in going back to the point of inception because there are no preconceived notions of what is to come. Even if people remember what came before, that was the past and this is the future, which stops for no one. When Vattnet, previously known to us as the post-black metal band Vattnet Viskar, lost one of their two founding members, they saw an opportunity to go back to the beginning and build from the ground up. Cleaving their band name in half, they looked toward the future and decided to make a self-titled album album that, in the words of guitarist Chris Alfieri, “we could listen to forever, even if no one else liked it.”

Hey! Listen to Arteries!

Sometimes bands and promoters feel the need to cram their press-releases with ridiculous and nonsensical claims about being “counterculture mercenaries” who dish out “stomping alpha-wolf brutality”; how they are the “sonic equivalent of Christopher Nolan, David Fincher and John Carpenter making a Hammer Horror style movie together, set inside an…

Connecting the Dots // The Dillinger Escape Plan

It’s been a while, but we’re back, so welcome to another edition of Connecting the Dots, and today we will be focusing on mathcore masterminds The Dillinger Escape Plan! Whilst they’re soon going to be shutting up shop (R.I.P), we can remain eternally grateful to the incredible records they’ve released during their two-decade career, their vicious live performances, and the incredible other musical projects they leave in their wake. Without further ado, let’s dive into the amazing projects these musicians have been a part of.

Street Sects – Rat Jacket

We’ve already vilified ourselves for missing Street Sects’s 2016 monster End Position, and if you haven’t heard it either, feel free to go spin the record now and share in our shame. The duo of multi-instrumentalist Shaun Ringsmuth and vocalist Leo Ashline came through with an exceptional dose of hyper-aggressive synth punk on End Position, making a bold statement in a genre defined by intensifying punk and its offshoots’ many disparate mannerisms. Not only was the album a debut that far exceeded the benchmark for a successful freshman full-length, it received well-deserved praise from the fickle beast that is the indie blogosphere. Perhaps the album’s success can be attributed to endorsement of well-respected “dark music” label The Flenser, or it could be due to the growing acceptance of heavy music as part of “normal” music consumption. However, there’s one undisputed factor for End Positions’s success, being the album’s undeniably impressive blend of industrial music and hardcore punk in a way that synth punk hasn’t seen done this well before. Seriously, if you haven’t heard this record, stop reading and go listen to it now; I won’t be offended, I promise.