The Response To PWR BTTM’s Sexual Assault Was Swift And Appropriate, So Why Can’t We Get It Right With Any Other Band?

When I found out that Ben Hopkins was outed as an abuser and rapist I was heartbroken. I was heartbroken for my friends who loved PWR BTTM. I was heartbroken for all of the queer kids and young queer adults who looked up to this band who (at the time) appeared to really care for their communities. They were activists. They were one of us. They held space for a community of people who didn’t quite fit in anywhere else. PWR BTTM stood up for us. They were just like us, and when people like us are ousted we see ourselves in them and we lash out. We grieve. We process. We take action. We compartmentalize. We move on and hope we won’t have to deal with this again until we do, because this is work that never stops.

Hey! Listen to The Flight of Sleipnir!

Let’s get something out of the way first – Sleipnir is an eight-legged horse variously featured in Norse mythology, most prominently in the Poetic/Prose Edda. Skadi, likewise featured in that most seminal of texts, is a jötunn most often associated with the bow and the hunt. If you have no idea what such references are doing on a metal album’s cover, please read this post by yours truly. Interestingly enough, The Flight of the Sleipnir have chosen unique and somewhat obscure Norse figures for their name and album title. Even more pleasing is the album itself. Skadi is a powerful exploration of the type of doom which draws its power from quiet, slow passages frequently interspersed amidst the tumultuous summits of its heavier segments. Unlike its fellow releases, however, Skadi manages to keep things fresh for the entirety of its run-time. Meet me below and let’s dive into the frozen landscape.

Rest In Peace, Chris Cornell

Chris Cornell died a “sudden and unexpected” death Wednesday night at the age of 52 in Detroid, MI while on tour. The Soundgarden and Audioslave frontman also started Temple of the Dog, whose other members would go on to form major grunge act Pearl Jam. Cornell, with the other members…

Grind My Tears: Portrayal of Guilt

It is in this new generation of emotionally charged, horrendously heavy music where we find Portrayal of Guilt. The band, hailing from Texas, does not play in the more direct style of thrash and emo, however. Instead they opt to play a far more brutal combination, blending the hectic, crazed pace of screamo with harsh black metal. It is a frightening combination, one that draws on the emotional torment inherent in both genres, and mixes them together into a truly pained form of musical catharsis. Add to that a little bit of 90’s metalcore in the vein of Coalesce and Converge, and you have one truly hectic blend of music.

White Ward – Futility Report

Black metal is having a fantastic two years. Besides the sheer volume of great releases, the best tell-tale of this prolific outburst is the sheer variety of sub-genres actively contributing to the main genre. This year alone, we’ve seen more “straight-forward” contributions (like Orm’s excellent, self titled release), atmospheric releases (like Somnium Nox’s excellent Terra Inanis), and more avant-garde experimentation (like Dodecahedron’s death metal tinged kwintessens or netra’s weird Ingrats). To this latter category, of black metal blended with unusual influences, we can now add White Ward’s Futility Report, a third release from a relatively unknown band which should, hopefully, garner them more attention.

This May, Myth of I and Chronologist are “Wanted Shred Or Alive”

In conjunction with The HEMISPHERE Music Movement and The New Fury, we’re super stoked to announce that we’re sponsoring a tour starting next month featuring instrumental metal up-and-comers Myth of I and Chronologist! The two Boston-born bands (although Chronologist has recently migrated cross-country to Austin, Texas) both play progressive-leaning metal that has less of an…

Hey! Listen to Subetroth!

There are things out there in the world that make you laugh wholeheartedly with how heavy they are. There are also things out there in the world that make you go “huh?”. The best things are those that do both these things at the same time and I’m proud to present to you one of those right here, right now, in the form of Subetroth. What is this? While their music can certainly be described as avant-garde doom, they sound nothing like their others in the sub-genre, like SubRosa for example. Subetroth however are so damn weird and doom-based that this is the only label that fits. They blend fretless guitar and bass with Southern/Western folk instruments and a doom so heavy, it makes you laugh. OK, just head on below for your first listen so I don’t have to tie my tongue into any more knots.