Hey! Listen to Hallux!

Thrash is often the good to example when talking about dead genres; it’s pretty much accepted wisdom that the heyday of the genre is over and done with. But, like all narratives, this sort of linear perspective on the life and death of a whole suite of musical ideas can blind us to great music still being made under its auspices today. Check out Vancouver’s Hallux for example. These guys make a high-octane, aggressive kind of thrash and blend it with plenty of influences from D-Beat, old school progressive death metal and more. The result is a self titled debut filled to the brim with fast riffs, high paced drumming and furious vocal screeches. Head on down below for your first taste and don’t forget to turn it up loud.

“Yersinia Pestis”, the second track on the album, is a great example of what Hallux do best. The main riff is in your face and is taking no prisoners but listen to the variety on the bass and the pleasing drum parts that accompany it. Nothing takes away from the raw, basic power of the track but there’s plenty happening in the background to keep you interested. The vocals are also far less than content to stick to one tack, instead alternating between more thick, belly centered growls and high pitched screams erupting from a ragged throat. Everything mingles together to create the puissant end product, a thrash-y track that kicks ass and does it gladly while still dedicating plenty of thought to being interesting and progressive.

The rest of the album moves along the lines so if you’re looking for some fresh and dynamic metal, Hallux have just the thing for you. Head on over to their Bandcamp above to grab the album and support the band. These are the kind of voices within thrash that we want to promote if we ever want to get a chance of breaking the narrative of its demise. And the more genres that are considered alive and working in metal, the better. Onwards the future!

Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.