Hey! Listen to ADCX!

It’s been just about a week since I told you to listen to instrumental post metal and gosh darn it, I’m here to do that again! This time around, we have ADCX (whose name means “A Day Called X” but don’t tell them I told you), a sci-fi influenced post-metal/doom band from Southend On Sea (that’s in the Old Kingdom, yeah?). Now, when I say they’re sci-fi “influenced”, I might be selling them a bit short; their 2017 album, The Day I Heard The Moon Roar shares its name witha novella written by Greg Kiss, who else spearheads the band. Their style lends its heavily to the Golden Age stylings of the story, exploring the cavernous reaches of space through texture, weight and distortion. Head on down below for your first taste.

 

Opening track “The Parlour Scene” is everything you need to know about the band. It starts off quietly enough to build momentum, but eventually unfolds in all the feedback heavy glory you might expect. The production shines bright on this track as it does on the entire album, with all the parts coming through pristine in its dominance. Especially enjoyable is the robust drum sound which, unlike what often happens in the genre, manages to not drown everything out while still maintaing the thick space needed for its delivery. The rest of the album plays off of elements found in “The Parlour Scene” (a name which corresponds to the first chapter of the novella) but also adds in elements from psychedelic rock and shoegaze.

The next track for example, “Comet Shoemaker”, introduces vocoder heavy vocals and a groovier approach to the drums and bass, accompanied by weird, 60’s drenched synths. Along other parts of the album, you can clearly hear the stoned out and doom-y makeup of the artists’ influences, ranging the spectrum betweeen crushingly heavy and playfully spaced out. Oh, and did I mention that there are great oil paintings which accompany the album and, indeed, every single track? That neat little bow on top should be enough to get my point across; The Day I Heard The Moon Roar is an accomplished and fully realized effort, exceeding and using its concept both musically and otherwise. More than all, it’s music that’s well worth your time if you enjoy the slower, more fuzzy side of post metal.

Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.