Hello, This Is a Play By Play Rebuttal Of David Hall’s Terrible Article And Also A Rebuttal to A Rebuttal by Clrvynt’s Editor And Some Thoughts About The Metal Community

Let's state facts: Clrvynt's preface to "The Director of 'Maryland Deathfest: The Movie':'Metal is the Fucking Worst'" (this is literally how the post's title was formatted by the way, I didn't change it) is bullshit. Running an article filled with borderline/not-really-borderline-at-all misogyny, homophobia, and very palpable hatred for a huge swath of the community you're part of is a terrible thing to do. However, if you've already decided to do that, don't cop out by writing a six-line preface nominally denouncing the opinions contained therein. At least own the fact that you're giving shitty opinions a stage and have some honesty.

Editors’ Picks: April 2017

Man, 2017, y'all. We realize that it's kind of our m.o. to be proponents of the whole "Golden Age of Metal" narrative and be incredibly positive about the consistently great level of stuff that is being put out from pretty much every part of the musical spectrum, but it's such an easy thing to do when we are so constantly bombarded with new material that utterly consumes our attention. Even in months where one of us might not have as many new albums that really impressed them, without doubt there will be another one who could barely keep up because of all the superb releases from genres they pay close attention to. This April has certainly been no different in that regard, and we have a whole slew of top-notch albums to recommend to you all.

Hey! Listen to Asira!

I've been on a post black metal binge right now and let me tell you, I regret absolutely nothing. The stylistic fringes are doing some great things right now, perhaps feeding off of the general momentum black metal seems to have in 2017. As part of this slew of new bands, UK based Asira have carved something of their own niche within my rotation. I've seen black metal tinged with almost everything but progressive rock is a new one for me. That's exactly what Efference does though: into the dream-y tremolo riffs and weighty blastbeats, it injects raw, treble focused solos that best belong on a Led Zeppelin album. Alongside, it also includes clean vocals and ambient sections which remind one of King Crimson or Yes. Yeah, I know, right? Head on below for your listen

Kvlt Kolvmn – March 2017

Well, third time's a charm, I guess—this here is the third consecutive installment of Kvlt Kolvmn Take Two, a monthly round-up of my favorite BM releases from the past 30-ish days. The only reason I'm surprised I could fill the column out this month is because of relatively little time I spent with black metal this month; there was just way too much incredible music coming out from virtually every other genre (seriously, if you haven't yet, take a read through this month's Editors' Picks). Still, the black metal I did listen to was some of the best I've heard so far this year, with one album currently in the running for my BM AOTY. So without further ado, let's dive in:

Dodecahedron – Kwintessens

It seems to come up every time a new record pops up within the niche that Gorguts, Portal, and Deathspell Omega built; there's not much room left in the sphere of dissonant, atmospheric, and abstract extreme metal due to the limitations of the style. Murk chords and blastbeats can only carry a record for so long (as we've seen with first casualty Plebeian Grandstand), and the novelty is wearing thin. Bands such as Ulcerate and Sunless thrive on the death metal end of the spectrum by offering depth and creative riffing, but black metal has yet to have much success in challenging Deathspell's monolithic reach. Dutch black metallers Dodecahedron are the best bet at carrying the torch into new territory, whose debut five years ago came (from seemingly) out of nowhere and quickly reached cult status. The group, who has significant ties to prog-fusion group Exivious, takes a more overtly progressive and technical approach to the sound, and therefore, into further extremities.

No Distortion: The Role of Acoustic Guitars in the Evolution of Black Metal

With cold, treble-tipped tremolo riffs, agonized rasps and Satanic imagery, black metal might seem like the farthest thing from acoustic folk. But despite their distance, acoustic guitar has slowly crept into black metal since its unholy birth, even with the strict cultural norms that once governed the sound and image of black metal. Interestingly, the use and purpose of acoustic guitars in black metal is not random, but traces patterns across the evolution of black metal, from Bathory to Panopticon.

Harakiri For The Sky – III: Trauma

To be frank, atmospheric black metal is a genre that's really, really easy to get right. Throw some folksy, naturalist guitar leads over tremolo chords and blast beats, slow it down for a meditative clean section every now and then, let the vocals act as more of a percussive guide to the music's flow than anything else, and boom: you've got atmospheric black metal a la Weakling, Wolves in the Throne Room, Saor, and countless others. Conversely, it's also a genre with a lot of forgettable bands; everyone is so focused on creating such a specific sound that experimentation gets thrown to the wayside in favor of the old paint-by-numbers experience.

Fuath – I

For a musician like Andy Marshall, whose experimentation ranges greatly on his Saor releases, this is a loving pause and meditation on a style of music that has considerably progressed in the past two decades. If you like standard black metal, or are even just starting out in the genre, this is an album to at least listen to. It offers none of the frills of Saor, and it is unapologetic of that fact. One must simply take it as it is: solid, traditional, black metal.