In Defense Of: Minutes to Midnight

Linkin Park exploded onto the scene in 2000 with Hybrid Theory, an album which would become a hit of monolithic proportions as it enjoyed enormous commercial success, and a fair amount of critical success to go with it. Their 2003 follow-up Meteora continued in much the same vein, and was also received reasonably well. However, 2007’s Minutes to Midnight marked a significant turning point for the band and for its fans. In a move which sparked a significant backlash among their fans, the band moved on from their nu-metal roots and adopted a more experimental, alternative rock sound. Fans cried of how the band had sold out, abandoned their roots and gone soft, whilst music journalists branded it bland and a failed U2 rip-off. That being said, it’s now time to begin our defense of Linkin Park’s most underrated album.

In Defense Of – Issues

With the recent release of the new Issues album Headspace, I think now is as good a time as any to contend with something that’s sat with me for years. In 2014, our beloved creator Jimmy posted a review for their self-titled debut. I encourage you to read his full thoughts on the album, but if you want the long story short, he wasn’t a fan of it due to bad production choices, banal lyrics and lack of strong songwriting. He gave it a 1.5/5, even going so far as to accuse the record of being “cringe-inducing.” Jimmy’s review has haunted me on and off ever since he posted it, as the record was my 2014 album of the year, so I think it’s time that I got into Issues’ corner to defend its honor by addressing some of Jimmy’s gripes while throwing in my own points of positivity.

In Defense Of: Nu-Metal

With the possible exception of crunkcore and whatever you call the music that the neo-goth kids at Hot Topic are listening to, nu-metal is perhaps the most divisive genre in metal (if you even consider it to be metal in the first place). Nowadays, the names Korn, Slipknot, Disturbed, Linkin Park, Godsmack and the dreaded Limp Bizkit are often followed with some sort of insult or derogatory humor in the metal world. Even us at Heavy Blog are guilty of this, to the point that we’ve made Evanescence’s “Bring Me To Life” into a meme in our own circles. Nu-metal is, at best, a joke in the minds of modern “TR00” metal fans.

ETHS – Ankaa

Once upon a time, there was a band called ETHS. This band did pretty much whatever the fuck they wanted, blending nu-metal with all sorts of influences. Did that mix work? Not really. The band were, somewhat rightfully, written off as another in the wave of post nu-metal hybrids that didn’t really hold water. However, it now appears that ETHS are back and that everything has changed. Nu-metal is no longer their mainstay and in its place, something much darker has seized center stage. Now, their latest album is called Ankaa, and its a brooding, massive piece of deathcore turned every other adjective from the dark spectrum of English. It has electronic breaks, oriental singing in Arabic, French nearly-spoken word, guttural growls, screams and whatever else you bloody well desire. This makes it a veritable monolith, eschewing cohesion for a narrative all of its own.

Half Life – Deftones

Welcome to yet another installment of Half Life, where we at Heavy Blog dissect a current band’s (i.e. a band that is still making music) discography. For previous articles in this column, please click here. Deftones are somewhat of an oddity in the rock/metal community. Their sound has an undefinable…

Deftones Tease Us All With ‘Tempest’

Deftones are among the stuff of legends. Each album evolving into something bigger than just nu-metal-style vocals over downtuned guitars, they have ascended the ranks and become one of the most popular bands in the realm of alt rock. And with their upcoming album Koi No Yokan getting ready to be…