33 – Edgy Pod Is Shitpost Cast

We're back to our normal setup! And just like many artists who make a comeback past their time, we're hella edgy this week. Since we skipped a week, this week is all news and discussion surrounding recent events! Like what, you ask? Well, Meshuggah's 25 year package, Sepultura working on their new album, Manowar's calling it quits, some random Christian band going full /r/atheism, Bandcamp's dig at Apple Music, Justin of Sikth being replaced by Joe of Aliases, Lee leaving After the Burial, Dragonforce releasing a "best of" album, Pain of Salvation remastering Remedy Lane. New music or teases thereof by: Periphery, Revocation, Whispered, Metallica, Last Chance To Reason, Whispered, Thank You Scientist, Starofash, Stam1na and Machine Head. The passing of Nick Menza of Megadeth. The end of Temples Festival. Finally, discussing this trendy "best of 2016 so far" list, some Apple Music playlist that tries way too hard, and Gojira's upcoming album Magma. Make sure you don't cut yourself with the edge on this episode!

The Anatomy Of: From Sorrow To Serenity

Watching a band develop over the years is a privilege that is hard to describe. But I'll give it a shot. A few years ago I caught From Sorrow To Serenity on a stacked line up in one of Glasgow's smaller metal venues. Their showmanship, technical ability and music left me with no doubt that the band were heading places. Skip forward a couple of years and their first full length has been released. Remnant Of Humanity is a colossal groove train of a record. Snapping up guest appearances from members of Bleed From Within, Betraying The Martyrs and Thy Art Is Murder, the album has been spun on national radio, spread all over the worldwide metal blogisphere and has the band supporting deathcore heavyweights Fit For An Autopsy on their upcoming UK tour. I pestered Steven Jones, the axeman and dial wizard from the band about where the From Sorrow To Serenity took shape. Bonne.

In Defense Of: Nu-Metal

With the possible exception of crunkcore and whatever you call the music that the neo-goth kids at Hot Topic are listening to, nu-metal is perhaps the most divisive genre in metal (if you even consider it to be metal in the first place). Nowadays, the names Korn, Slipknot, Disturbed, Linkin Park, Godsmack and the dreaded Limp Bizkit are often followed with some sort of insult or derogatory humor in the metal world. Even us at Heavy Blog are guilty of this, to the point that we’ve made Evanescence’s “Bring Me To Life” into a meme in our own circles. Nu-metal is, at best, a joke in the minds of modern “TR00” metal fans.

Kill Your Idols: Phil Anselmo and How We Talk About Uncomfortable Truths

It's been a few days since the metal community was seemingly upended by a video depicting Phil Anselmo performing a Nazi salute and screaming "WHITE POWER" at the end of his set at Dimebash 2016. The video dropped like a nuclear bomb, bringing with it far-reaching radiation across the internet as music columnists, artists, and fans have been tearing each other apart over how strongly one should criticize or defend him. But when we fight about these things, we're all taking the easy way out by focusing solely on the target at hand and not at all why we fight about these things to begin with. We should be asking ourselves, Why does this happen? Why do we care so much about the actions of these people we don't know? Why do we get so offended and outraged when our preconceived notions and admiration for these people are questioned? And mostly, why is it that we suck so much at talking about any of this?

Standing In Solidarity Against Bigotry

I know it’s not always easy to stand up and say something. It’s awkward. It could get you ostracized—or worse. But you have a choice. Those who are on the receiving end of bigotry don’t have the luxury to make this choice. You do. The more people let bigotry slide, the more it gains ground. No one feels like they can stop it by themselves. That’s just it—they can’t. As a group, however, by standing in solidarity, we can slow its tide, one voice at a time. It truly makes a difference and it’s the only way we can eventually make metal as open to anyone who wants to be part of our family.