Rick Chapple of Devil Sold His Soul – The Heavy Blog Interview

During the mid-2000s, the UK hardcore and metal scene underwent a re-energisation of sorts due to the emergence of several bands who have since spearheaded the genres to modern popularity. Bands like Enter Shikari and Bring Me the Horizon resonated with mainstream crowds since their inceptions and have since established themselves as global institutions. On the other hand, Architects instantly occupied the forefront of an underground charge and, over the years, have also crossed over into popular realms. However, bubbling underneath the surface was (and still is) a whole scene of innovative, vital artists whose records define the country’s musical output at its finest, with albums that will undoubtedly stand the test of time among aficionados of heavy music. One such act is Devil Sold His Soul who, in this writer’s humble opinion, are one of the best bands the UK has ever birthed.

In Defense Of Linkin Park’s New Generic Pop Sound

Linkin Park are pop now. With their last three tracks - “Heavy,’’ “Battle Symphony’’ and “Good Goodbye’’ - they are one step closer to becoming an all-out boyband. Even for a band who are hated by a significant portion of metal circles, the new tracks have incurred the wrath and mockery of haters and fans alike. But it’s not that much of a grand departure either; Linkin Park has always been rooted in pop music to an extent. When they arrived on the scene during the apex of nu-metal, they brought a polished shine to the genre that was much more accessible than that of their peers. Hybrid Theory was a groundbreaking album in many ways, but it lacked the abrasiveness of Limp Bizkit and Korn records, offering a squeaky clean alternative to many of their peers. While pop elements can be found in the music of most popular nu-metal bands from the genre’s heyday, Linkin Park embraced them more on a grander scale from the get go.

A Decade Of Deathcore: Suicide Silence’s The Cleansing

Like it or not, a whole bunch of the staff at Heavy Blog "grew up" on deathcore in the mid to late 2000's. Some love to admit it and some loathe to—some didn't listen to it at all because they were clearly more well-adjusted to life and stuff. With a decade of deathcore now (well and truly) behind us, it's probably an appropriate time to look at some of the genre's most notable releases in that time. As it's 2017, let's start with 2007 (well done, mathletes) and the first full length from California lyric shirt pioneers Suicide Silence. If your favourite deathcore release came out in 2006 then sorry, look elsewhere.

Half-Life: Limp Bizkit

Limp Bizkit are far from the most unanimously loved band to ever grace the metal spectrum. Often derided as abrasive and angst-ridden rap metal for beer-swilling frat boys, it’s perfectly understandable why they’ve never found acclaim among the purists. However, there was a time when they were inescapable commercial juggernauts with a tendency to make headlines for the wrong reasons, as well as poster boys for the much maligned nu-metal subgenre.

Suicide Silence – Suicide Silence

When analyzing art, it is important to keep both the artist's experience in creating the art and the experience of the consumer absorbing the art in mind. Often times, an artist's vision can be obscured by our view point and we can lose sight of what was meant to be gained from the experience. On the other side, regardless of what an artist's intent may be, the consumer has every right to like or dislike something based on their own personal preference. There's even the possibility that you can completely understand where the creator of art is coming from and appreciate their intent and artistic integrity, but think that the art itself isn't something remotely enjoyable. In this middle ground of understanding and distaste for what is understood, we find the new self-titled Suicide Silence album nestled quite comfortably.

Korn – The Serenity of Suffering

Few bands out there can lay claim to influencing the creation of an entire musical movement. Meshuggah's a relatively recent candidate with the explosion of the djent genre that formed in their wake, and despite what you think of the copycats that followed, you can't necessarily blame them for it; they're a band that did something different and naturally, others took notice. Korn are in the same boat; their 1993 self titled debut is a celebrated classic, and despite some missteps and the continued teenage angst from an aging band, they should not be thought of in a negative light because of the legions of terrible acts that followed.

54 – On Strange Hoops

As you can tell, we talk about the new Mithras album. Obviously, we talk about news. That is the established format of this podcast after all! We talk about the new Painted in Exile album (finally!), The Corelia kickstarter, the new Avenged Sevenfold album (that came out of nowhere), the new Korn album (yep), the Scale the Summit "breakup", the Allegaeon Patreaon, Frontierer's first live show and Arkona's new old song. We also reflect back on things, like Linkin Park's Hybrid Theory turning 16 and our discussion on Slice the Cake from last week. We also mention a few other things, like a Guitar Hero chart of A Sense of Gravity's Echo Chasers, and some shitty flute covers, including this excellent one of Dragonforce's masterpiece. Then, our underrated album, which is Rishloo's Living As Ghosts With Buildings As Teeth. Also, our cool people section covers some important topics! I promise!

40 – Cool People Time

This week we don't care, we're going full cool people time! There's some metal stuff at the end, including Rob Halford doing Judas Priest material with Babymetal live, new material from The Agonist, Allegaeon, Thy Catafalque, Korn, Thank You Scientist, A Million Dead Birds Laughing and Mephistopheles. Also, Archspire are working on a new album! Check after the jump for more info on all the cool stuff we talk about.