“People Think This &@%# is Good?!” // Dealing With “That” Album

We’ve all been there; we’ll see (or, rather, hear) a new album that, to you, doesn’t quite live up to expectations. And that’s all great, but then the rest of the world seems to explode about said album, praising it as the paragon of a new age of music. The critics can barely keep it in their pants because of it; your friends won’t shut up about it; it sweeps all the AOTY lists, and any other awards ceremony you might care about, all the while you just sit there and wonder: “why?” Why the fuck would anyone find this to be that good? You might wonder if you just don’t “get it,” like you’re missing an important part of the picture. Again, this is hardly a new experience for most music listeners, regardless of genre, but it’s a phenomenon so frustrating that it tries you again and again. I can definitely say that I’ve been there in the last few years; there are just some releases that seem beyond my perception. I’ve learned (or at least have tried) to get over it, and ignore it, but, you know, it’s tough, so I thought it might be a good idea to explain ways of dealing with that album in a positive way, instead of becoming another internet troll or just getting frustrated enough to punch a hole in the wall.

No Heroes In New England // Week of May 22, 2016

Welcome to No Heroes in New England, a new feature on Heavy Blog where we give a nod to some of the newest and relatively undiscovered hardcore talent coming out of New England. The word “hardcore” is a term with a bit of history, so we’ll be covering anything within the hardcore genre, whether it’s punk, metallic hardcore, or post-hardcore. As long as it tears faces off with its aggression and comes from New England, we’ll cover it. New England has been one of the capitals of hardcore music since bands like SS Decontrol and DYS broke out of Boston in the 1980s, and in the last thirty or so years it’s cemented its status, giving the world groups like Converge and Killswitch Engage who have indelibly changed the face of metal and hardcore music for the better. To ignore this part of America is missing a crucial chunk of music today, as even relatively new acts such as Trap Them and The Great American Ghost hail from New England.

Todd Jones of Nails: The Heavy Blog Is Heavy Interview

With extreme music, it seems as if there is an almost constant quest to further push the boundaries of just how much misanthropy and hate is included, with many bands often pushing it to somewhat cheesy levels. However, there are those rare few bands whose sound is so intense, so raw, so heinously abrasive that it is impossible to deny that deep down, on some level, they really are just about as misanthropic and nasty as they claim to be. Nails is one of those bands, and though the interview below shows front man Todd Jones at times joking, it is undeniable that his brutal honesty and straight forward honesty shows just how serious Nails is about their message of complete and total musical annihilation. I had the extreme pleasure of sitting down with Todd at Choosing Death Fest in Philadelphia and talking to him about all things extreme music, and what it truly means to be "one of us".

EXCLUSIVE PREMIERE: Stream The New Lower Automation EP!

I get messages in my inbox every day about bands that I should check out, and I listen to all of them, despite what some people may think. I have to make sure that people are sending me quality stuff, and I also tend to let people know when stuff doesn't gel well with me. I get tons of cool stuff every single day, and sometimes, I'm fortunate enough to host some exclusives on the site for your listening pleasure. Lower Automation is a band that I was completely unfamiliar with prior to receiving an email roughly a week ago when I got asked to host the exclusive stream of their new EP Maps. I honestly had no idea what to expect, but what I found was some seriously great mathcore. Check it out below!

Can This Even Be Called Music? 苦しみ (Kurushimi)

The Southern hemisphere's island-continent of Australia has lately been the unholiest of breeding grounds for music, and the label Art as Catharsis has been hand-picking the most beautifully hideous flowers for years to make an ever-growing bouquet of the most obscene kind. They deal with all sorts of music, mostly metal - post-metal, drone, shoegaze, black metal, you name it - and jazz, but always with an experimental twist to it, and often blending various styles and blurring the lines between the genres. Most recently, I've come to absolutely love it through bands like Instrumental (adj.), Dumbsaint, Serious Beak, We Lost the Sea and, today's topic, Kurushimi.