Oathbreaker – Rheia

As Fenriz (of Darkthrone/now political fame) once said, the line between black and crust was inevitably erased with the release of His Hero Is Gone’s monumental album “Monuments To Thieves”. At first this blurring of genres was subtle as artists found success in one another’s respective scenes. Then, as artists like Fall Of Efrafra and Nux Vomica began to emerge with the turn of the century what was once truly a line in the sand was fully erased. Black metal bands swarmed to crust stylings in force and vica-versa. Soon a whole new generation of artists had emerged and it became standard that no black metal album was complete with out a d-beat and no crust album without a black metal riff. It was during these years that West Flander’s/Belgium’s Oathbreaker began to find their footing with an abrasive, but often heavily melodic, blend of post hardcore, hardcore, and black metal. Like many of their peers at the time they leaned heavily into the more crust/hardcore oriented territory of their sound, but with Rheia Oathbreaker finally breaks free of this constraint, bringing their influences full circle to create an intoxicating, dynamic album.

Every Piece Matters – Why Plini Represents The Best Of Nu-Prog

We’re here to talk about Plini and why his music should be the blueprint for this growing genre. The reasons are many and, while chronology isn’t that good of a reason, it might do to first mention that he’s had his name on releases going as far back as 2011. His own releases, along 2013-2015, were tasteful, imaginative sojourns into well defined and enticing musical places. These set some of the main tropes of the genre, including the overall sleek yet colorful aesthetic surrounding the music. But what is it about Plini that makes him rise above the rest? In a growing genre that’s already often sounding stale and repetitive, how does he manage to make music which is distinctly his and is interesting to boot? That’s the purpose of this article, to examine Plini’s appeal and strength of delivery and perhaps, along the way, take a good, hard look at nu-prog and all it has yet to learn.

Mick Gordon’s Work Spells DOOM For Traditional Soundtracks

Earlier this year, iD Software released the newest game in the storied Doom series, and despite negative reception to early builds of the game, the final product turned out to be the most entertaining and bad-ass shooter in years. According to the developers, the final build of the game was inspired by “Huge demons, fast movement, big fucking guns and metal” and it certainly shows. That design philosophy extends to the incredible soundtrack that goes a long way towards selling the whole aesthetic. Bringing back the talent of Australian composer Mick Gordon, who also did the soundtrack for the excellent Wolfenstein: The New Order and season one of Microsoft’s rebooted Killer Instinct, Doom’s soundtrack, officially (finally) released yesterday. It’s over 2 hours of grooving metallic riffs and pounding industrial/electronic elements blended together so seamlessly you’ll wonder why it hasn’t ever been done this well before.