Wormed – Krighsu

Spanish brutal technical death masters Wormed have certainly carved out a niche for themselves. There are certain aspects one expects from a band’s sound when hearing those labels. However, Wormed go above and beyond. Ridiculous vocals, dissonant, alien riffing and unrelenting heaviness are what Wormed bring to the table. With slam influences and a grindcore background, Wormed had already became a name that is instantly synonymous with their unique sound after their debut album Planisphaeruim. Their Quasineutrality EP after that showed that they were no one-hit-wonder, and their follow-up Exodromos was an instant classic. With such high expectations and a niche sound, their third release was surely going to be a turning point for their career, deciding whether they’re relegated to one-trick-pony status, or if they can keep building their sound. Well, Krighsu is upon us, and Wormed show no sign of slowing down.

Starter Kit – Blackened Hardcore

Ah, blackened hardcore, taking two subgenres of extreme music with a violent desire to “prove” oneself, as well as inciting the most sweaty internet arguments, and mashing them together. A true recipe for success in all ways, shapes, and forms. However, in blackened hardcore’s defense, it does prove to be somewhat of an anomaly, skipping out on the worst fans from either genres and existing more for the true misanthropes present in both; dirty, grimy people who truly just hate everyone else (as well as themselves). That is where the true magic of blackened hardcore lies, not that it (somehow) has some of the most tolerable fans out of any of extreme music’s subgenres, but that it so perfectly portrays what extreme music always strives to be; nasty, brutal, and abrasive. It is not music to be taken lightly, and is best listened to all alone in a dark room somewhere so that one can truly feel their complete and utter contempt for reality.

*DISCLAIMER: Blackened grindcore, as well as blackened hardcore, will be included in this list since the two are so closely linked. Neo crust, while similar, still remains distinctly different due to its more heavily atmospheric/post rock-ish leanings.*

Half-Life – Sunn O)))

Even the staunchest Sunn O))) fan has to realize why the band is some of the most polarizing groups in underground music. Core duo Stephen O’Malley and Greg Anderson took idea of a gargantuam wall of guitars – pioneered by Earth’s debut Earth 2: Special Low Frequency Version – and escalated it beyond its logical extent at the time,…

Hey! Listen to Electric Hoodoo!

It’s a well documented fact that rock music has roots in the blues; you can’t really step into rock without running into the staples of the genre. Bands like Led Zeppelin, Guns N’ Roses, Rolling Stones, Aerosmith and more all lapped up the sounds of B.B. King and Muddy Waters like milk in their early careers. Blues rock is still prevalent today, with bands like The Black Keys and The White Stripes taking massive influences from early blues acts. But where’s blues metal in all of this? We always think of blues rock, but not much more. Guns N’ Roses arguably footed the line between hard rock and metal, and some bands today – Elder comes to mind, as do many bands from the recent trend of throwback and “occult” metal (Graveyard, Witchcraft) – have some minor hints of blues. However, we never really think of/see metal bands adding a significant chunk of Muddy Waters to their music.
I believe that Electric Hoodoo, and their self-titled album, are an important stepping stone on the path to that blues metal sound. While they aren’t entirely metal, they are about as heavy as you’re going to get at the moment with a band so inspired by the blues.