Ails – The Unraveling

A musician’s “return” after an extended absence from music (whether that be from an intentional hiatus or otherwise) is an interesting peek into their creative headspace. Do they prove themselves creatures of habit, or were they reinvented over this intermission? In the case of Ails, it’s a little of both.…

The Crown – Cobra Speed Venom

Swedish death metal veterans The Crown are back with their 10th full length album, Cobra Speed Venom, almost thirty years since their formation in 1990. Despite their longevity, the band seem to have remained largely unknown relative to their contemporaries such as In Flames, At the Gates, Soilwork and more.…

Dark Hound – Dawning

What goes around, comes around. What’s old is new again. People say this shit all the time because it holds so true. We’ve seen it with just about every style of music, and metal has gotten some real good out of it (see: re-thrash, “occult” metal). While I don’t know exactly what constitutes a genre “revival,” I do know is that if my limited awareness tells me anything about a recent “nu-metal revival,” it’s safe to assume that a “NWOAHM revival” is just around the corner… or emerging. If we are in fact uber-predictable creatures of habit, Nashville’s Dark Hound might be a harbinger of the return of trucker hats, studded belts, and Jagerbombs.

Hey! Listen to Triple Kill!

Earlier in the week Eden introduced us to fun-loving Canadian weirdos Bird Problems, and I couldn’t help but think that Australia must have something of the sort. Enter Triple Kill, relative newcomers to the heavy metal scene in Melbourne. The quintet play straight up heavy metal, with drummer Connor O’Keane listing some of their key influences as “Iron Maiden, Blind Guardian, Lamb of God and Pantera”. Add to this mixture of power metal and groove some distinct characteristics from both thrash and melodic death metal and you have yourself Triple Kill’s core sound. However, things don’t just stop at the music. Triple Kill have quickly made a name for themselves for producing some fantastic, hilarious videos. But hey, don’t take my word for it, check out the band’s introductory video below:

Hey! Listen to Daeva!

20 Buck Spin is on a roll in 2017. With a bevy of fantastic releases from the likes of Acephalix, Spirit Adrift, Witch Vomit, Weaponizer, Extremity, The Ominous Circle, and a slew of other talented bands, the label continues to make some serious waves in the metal world. We can…

Propagandhi – Victory Lap

Some music comes to you as rain into your sun-parched throat as you traverse a desert. Such is the vitality that music can bring into our lives. Some songs are as necessary to some people’s lives, if not sanity, that it reminds us why we love the art form. In…

Love Letter – Himsa

It’s hard to believe that there was a time before the steady stream of blasé lyric videos, but at the turn of the millennium, music video purveyor MTV had to “bring back” the music video. The artform was essentially replaced by trashy reality television and cartoons by the late 90s, but eventually came MTV2 – a quality sequel (well, for a few years) nobody really deserved. So I guess it only made sense that they also resurrected their metalhead favorite from the 80s and 90s soon thereafter – Headbangers Ball. After all, this era had a ton to offer. The NWOAHM movement was all the rage, metalcore was hitting its stride, and melodeath was pretty much the coolest shit ever. Given that the combo of Kazaa and my dial-up setup wasn’t doing me any good – true story: I waited days (plural) to download Meshuggah’s Chaosphere only to find out that some jerk just relabeled of Neurotica tracks (some truly evil bastards out there), this couldn’t have been better timing for a dude who had recently gotten his license and began to fall in love with hanging out at the record store – the internet, for me, sucked for digging up new tunes.

Heavy Rewind – 1987: The Year in Metal

Every once in a great while we have calendar years that see iconic releases across a range of styles. It is rare that we see this happen in just one particular style. 1987 was one such year, though, as the entire spectrum of heaviness saw iconic records drop like so many tears from the eyes of mainstream pop music stars that these albums would devour. At the time, it didn’t seem like this was any different of a year for music until fans started to take a look at their growing record collections and what would spin out from the influence of so many landmark albums.